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Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk.

Gamella-Pozuelo L, Fuentes-Calvo I, Gómez-Marcos MA, Recio-Rodriguez JI, Agudo-Conde C, Fernández-Martín JL, Cannata-Andía JB, López-Novoa JM, García-Ortiz L, Martínez-Salgado C - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Bottom Line: We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker.This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness-C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index-ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate).Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients.CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk.Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product.Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Unidad de Fisiopatología Renal y Cardiovascular (LG-P, IF-C, JML-N, CM-S), Departamento de Fisiología y Farmacología, Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigación Nefrológica, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca; Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca (IBSAL) (IF-C, MAG-M, JIR-R, CA-C, JML-N, LG-O, CM-S), Salamanca; Unidad de Investigación (MAG-M, JIR-R, CA-C, LG-O), Centro de Salud La Alamedilla, SACYL, Salamanca; Servicio de Metabolismo Óseo y Mineral (JLF-M, JBC-A), Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigación Nefrológica, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo; and Instituto de Estudios de Ciencias de la Salud de Castilla y León (IECSCYL) (CM-S), Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker.This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness-C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index-ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate).Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product.Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage.

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Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) plasma levels in DM (group of diabetic patients), HT (group of hypertensive patients), and Control (group of nondiabetic and nonhypertensive patients) groups. Statistically significant differences: ∗∗P < 0.01 versus Control group.
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Figure 1: Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) plasma levels in DM (group of diabetic patients), HT (group of hypertensive patients), and Control (group of nondiabetic and nonhypertensive patients) groups. Statistically significant differences: ∗∗P < 0.01 versus Control group.

Mentions: General demographic, physical, and medical parameters of the patients under study are characteristic of the European adult population >50 years old (Table 1). Hypertensive and diabetic patients have significantly higher plasmatic CT-1 levels than controls (Figure 1). Moreover, in the whole population (Total group) there are positive correlations of CT-1 with SBP, DBP, PP, basal glycaemia, and LVH evaluated by VDP-Cornell (Table 2). Moreover, we observe that CT-1 levels are higher in the presence than in the absence of LVH after grouping the patients by VDP-Cornell and Sokolow values (Figure 2).


Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk.

Gamella-Pozuelo L, Fuentes-Calvo I, Gómez-Marcos MA, Recio-Rodriguez JI, Agudo-Conde C, Fernández-Martín JL, Cannata-Andía JB, López-Novoa JM, García-Ortiz L, Martínez-Salgado C - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) plasma levels in DM (group of diabetic patients), HT (group of hypertensive patients), and Control (group of nondiabetic and nonhypertensive patients) groups. Statistically significant differences: ∗∗P < 0.01 versus Control group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554114&req=5

Figure 1: Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) plasma levels in DM (group of diabetic patients), HT (group of hypertensive patients), and Control (group of nondiabetic and nonhypertensive patients) groups. Statistically significant differences: ∗∗P < 0.01 versus Control group.
Mentions: General demographic, physical, and medical parameters of the patients under study are characteristic of the European adult population >50 years old (Table 1). Hypertensive and diabetic patients have significantly higher plasmatic CT-1 levels than controls (Figure 1). Moreover, in the whole population (Total group) there are positive correlations of CT-1 with SBP, DBP, PP, basal glycaemia, and LVH evaluated by VDP-Cornell (Table 2). Moreover, we observe that CT-1 levels are higher in the presence than in the absence of LVH after grouping the patients by VDP-Cornell and Sokolow values (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker.This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness-C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index-ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate).Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients.CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk.Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product.Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Unidad de Fisiopatología Renal y Cardiovascular (LG-P, IF-C, JML-N, CM-S), Departamento de Fisiología y Farmacología, Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigación Nefrológica, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca; Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca (IBSAL) (IF-C, MAG-M, JIR-R, CA-C, JML-N, LG-O, CM-S), Salamanca; Unidad de Investigación (MAG-M, JIR-R, CA-C, LG-O), Centro de Salud La Alamedilla, SACYL, Salamanca; Servicio de Metabolismo Óseo y Mineral (JLF-M, JBC-A), Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigación Nefrológica, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo; and Instituto de Estudios de Ciencias de la Salud de Castilla y León (IECSCYL) (CM-S), Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker.This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness-C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index-ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate).Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product.Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus