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Cytokine profiles contribute to understanding the pathogenic difference between Good syndrome and oral lichen planus: two case reports and literature review.

Maehara T, Moriyama M, Kawano S, Hayashida JN, Furukawa S, Ohta M, Tanaka A, Yamauchi M, Ohyama Y, Kiyoshima T, Nakamura S - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Bottom Line: However, IL-4 and IL-17 were detected in OLP patients only.These results suggest that the pathogenesis of GS is different from that of OLP.GS is a unique inflammatory disorder characterized by dysfunction of Th2 and Th17 immune reactions via abnormal T-B cell interaction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology (TM, MM, SK, J-NH, SF, MO, AT, MY, SN); Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (YO); and Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Laboratory of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan (YK).

ABSTRACT
We described and analyzed the pathogenic difference between Good syndrome (GS) and oral lichen planus (OLP) in oral mucosa. Good syndrome (GS) is a rare disease characterized by B and T cell immunodeficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and thymoma. GS patients frequently develop oral lichenoid lesions with lymphocytic infiltration beneath the basal layer. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa characterized by destruction of basal cells by Langerhans cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Although the histological features of the lesions of both diseases are very similar, the pathogenesis of GS in the oral mucosa remains unknown. In this study, we thus investigated the expression of infiltrating lymphocyte subsets (CD3, CD20, CD4, and CD8) and T helper (Th) cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ (Th1 type), interleukin (IL)-4 (Th2 type), IL-17 (Th17 type), and IL-10 (regulatory T cell type) by immunohistochemistry in buccal mucosa specimens from 2 GS patients compared with 15 OLP patients. All patients showed a predominance of CD3 T cells over CD20 B cells, and CD4 Th cells over CD8 cytotoxic T cells. This polarization was especially prominent in GS. IFN-γ and IL-10 were strongly detected in the infiltrating lymphocytes of all patients. However, IL-4 and IL-17 were detected in OLP patients only. These results suggest that the pathogenesis of GS is different from that of OLP. GS is a unique inflammatory disorder characterized by dysfunction of Th2 and Th17 immune reactions via abnormal T-B cell interaction.

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Distribution of T helper cytokines in the buccal mucosa from patients with GS and OLP. Immunostaining with anti-IFN-γ (a, b, i, and j), anti-IL-4 (c, d, k, and l), anti-IL-10 (e, f, m, and n), and anti-IL-17 (g, h, o, and p) monoclonal antibodies in buccal mucosa of representative patients with GS and OLP. Counterstaining with Mayer's hematoxylin (blue). Scale bars, 100 μm. (B) Number of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL17+ cells per HPF were counted in 1-mm2 sections from five different areas from patients with GS (n = 2) and OLP (n = 15). GS = Good syndrome, HPF = high-power field, IFN = interferon, IL = interleukin, OLP = oral lichen planus.
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Figure 4: Distribution of T helper cytokines in the buccal mucosa from patients with GS and OLP. Immunostaining with anti-IFN-γ (a, b, i, and j), anti-IL-4 (c, d, k, and l), anti-IL-10 (e, f, m, and n), and anti-IL-17 (g, h, o, and p) monoclonal antibodies in buccal mucosa of representative patients with GS and OLP. Counterstaining with Mayer's hematoxylin (blue). Scale bars, 100 μm. (B) Number of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL17+ cells per HPF were counted in 1-mm2 sections from five different areas from patients with GS (n = 2) and OLP (n = 15). GS = Good syndrome, HPF = high-power field, IFN = interferon, IL = interleukin, OLP = oral lichen planus.

Mentions: Given the results observed for lymphocyte subsets, it was of interest to investigate the involvement of CD4+ Th cells in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Th cell populations comprise functionally distinct subsets characterized by specific patterns of cytokine production. At least 4 subsets have been described including Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which produce IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17, and IL-10, respectively. As shown in Figure 4, the specimens were immunohistochemically examined to evaluate the distributions of these cytokines in the buccal mucosa from GS and OLP patients. IFN-γ and IL-10 were strongly detected in the infiltrating lymphocytes of lamina propria from both GS and OLP patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-17 were also detected in the lymphocytic infiltration of lamina propria from the OLP patients, whereas they were rarely seen in the GS patient.


Cytokine profiles contribute to understanding the pathogenic difference between Good syndrome and oral lichen planus: two case reports and literature review.

Maehara T, Moriyama M, Kawano S, Hayashida JN, Furukawa S, Ohta M, Tanaka A, Yamauchi M, Ohyama Y, Kiyoshima T, Nakamura S - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Distribution of T helper cytokines in the buccal mucosa from patients with GS and OLP. Immunostaining with anti-IFN-γ (a, b, i, and j), anti-IL-4 (c, d, k, and l), anti-IL-10 (e, f, m, and n), and anti-IL-17 (g, h, o, and p) monoclonal antibodies in buccal mucosa of representative patients with GS and OLP. Counterstaining with Mayer's hematoxylin (blue). Scale bars, 100 μm. (B) Number of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL17+ cells per HPF were counted in 1-mm2 sections from five different areas from patients with GS (n = 2) and OLP (n = 15). GS = Good syndrome, HPF = high-power field, IFN = interferon, IL = interleukin, OLP = oral lichen planus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554038&req=5

Figure 4: Distribution of T helper cytokines in the buccal mucosa from patients with GS and OLP. Immunostaining with anti-IFN-γ (a, b, i, and j), anti-IL-4 (c, d, k, and l), anti-IL-10 (e, f, m, and n), and anti-IL-17 (g, h, o, and p) monoclonal antibodies in buccal mucosa of representative patients with GS and OLP. Counterstaining with Mayer's hematoxylin (blue). Scale bars, 100 μm. (B) Number of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL17+ cells per HPF were counted in 1-mm2 sections from five different areas from patients with GS (n = 2) and OLP (n = 15). GS = Good syndrome, HPF = high-power field, IFN = interferon, IL = interleukin, OLP = oral lichen planus.
Mentions: Given the results observed for lymphocyte subsets, it was of interest to investigate the involvement of CD4+ Th cells in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Th cell populations comprise functionally distinct subsets characterized by specific patterns of cytokine production. At least 4 subsets have been described including Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which produce IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17, and IL-10, respectively. As shown in Figure 4, the specimens were immunohistochemically examined to evaluate the distributions of these cytokines in the buccal mucosa from GS and OLP patients. IFN-γ and IL-10 were strongly detected in the infiltrating lymphocytes of lamina propria from both GS and OLP patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-17 were also detected in the lymphocytic infiltration of lamina propria from the OLP patients, whereas they were rarely seen in the GS patient.

Bottom Line: However, IL-4 and IL-17 were detected in OLP patients only.These results suggest that the pathogenesis of GS is different from that of OLP.GS is a unique inflammatory disorder characterized by dysfunction of Th2 and Th17 immune reactions via abnormal T-B cell interaction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology (TM, MM, SK, J-NH, SF, MO, AT, MY, SN); Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (YO); and Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Laboratory of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan (YK).

ABSTRACT
We described and analyzed the pathogenic difference between Good syndrome (GS) and oral lichen planus (OLP) in oral mucosa. Good syndrome (GS) is a rare disease characterized by B and T cell immunodeficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and thymoma. GS patients frequently develop oral lichenoid lesions with lymphocytic infiltration beneath the basal layer. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa characterized by destruction of basal cells by Langerhans cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Although the histological features of the lesions of both diseases are very similar, the pathogenesis of GS in the oral mucosa remains unknown. In this study, we thus investigated the expression of infiltrating lymphocyte subsets (CD3, CD20, CD4, and CD8) and T helper (Th) cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ (Th1 type), interleukin (IL)-4 (Th2 type), IL-17 (Th17 type), and IL-10 (regulatory T cell type) by immunohistochemistry in buccal mucosa specimens from 2 GS patients compared with 15 OLP patients. All patients showed a predominance of CD3 T cells over CD20 B cells, and CD4 Th cells over CD8 cytotoxic T cells. This polarization was especially prominent in GS. IFN-γ and IL-10 were strongly detected in the infiltrating lymphocytes of all patients. However, IL-4 and IL-17 were detected in OLP patients only. These results suggest that the pathogenesis of GS is different from that of OLP. GS is a unique inflammatory disorder characterized by dysfunction of Th2 and Th17 immune reactions via abnormal T-B cell interaction.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus