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Physio-biochemical and morphological characters of halophyte legume shrub, Acacia ampliceps seedlings in response to salt stress under greenhouse.

Theerawitaya C, Tisarum R, Samphumphuang T, Singh HP - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants.However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91).The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency , Pathum Thani, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Acacia ampliceps (salt wattle), a leguminous shrub, has been introduced in salt-affected areas in the northeast of Thailand for the remediation of saline soils. However, the defense mechanisms underlying salt tolerance A. ampliceps are unknown. We investigated various physio-biochemical and morphological attributes of A. ampliceps in response to varying levels of salt treatment (200-600 mM NaCl). Seedlings of A. ampliceps (25 ± 2 cm in plant height) raised from seeds were treated with 200 mM (mild stress), 400 and 600 mM (extreme stress) of salt treatment (NaCl) under greenhouse conditions. Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants. Free proline and soluble sugar contents in plants grown under extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl) for 9 days significantly increased by 28.7 (53.33 μmol g(-1) FW) and 3.2 (42.11 mg g(-1) DW) folds, respectively over the control, thereby playing a major role as osmotic adjustment. Na(+) enrichment in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed seedlings positively related to total chlorophyll (TC) degradation (R (2) = 0.72). Photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence in salt-stressed plants increased under mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl). However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91). The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

No MeSH data available.


Free proline (A) and total soluble sugar (B) content of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
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Figure 4: Free proline (A) and total soluble sugar (B) content of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.

Mentions: Free proline content in the phyllodes of salt-stressed plants was increased significantly, especially in plants under extreme stress. It increased by 7.1 (13.18 μmol g–1 FW) and 28.7 fold (53.33 μmol g–1 FW) in plants growing under 400 and 600 mM NaCl, over that in the control plants (1.86 μmol g–1 FW; Figure 4A). Similarly, the total soluble sugar were continuously accumulated in the phyllodes of salt-stressed plants and peaked to 42.1 mg g–1 DW (∼3.2 fold of control) in plants grown under 600 mM NaCl (Figure 4B). Sucrose, glucose, and fructose contents in salt-stressed plants were increased in relation to degree of salt stress. The sucrose, glucose, and fructose in plants grown under 600 mM NaCl were 2.2, 3.7, and 5.1 fold of control, respectively (Table 2). The accumulation of glucose and fructose was comparatively less in plants under 200 mM NaCl, where it increased by 2.3 and 3.6 fold, respectively, over that in the control plants.


Physio-biochemical and morphological characters of halophyte legume shrub, Acacia ampliceps seedlings in response to salt stress under greenhouse.

Theerawitaya C, Tisarum R, Samphumphuang T, Singh HP - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Free proline (A) and total soluble sugar (B) content of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553901&req=5

Figure 4: Free proline (A) and total soluble sugar (B) content of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
Mentions: Free proline content in the phyllodes of salt-stressed plants was increased significantly, especially in plants under extreme stress. It increased by 7.1 (13.18 μmol g–1 FW) and 28.7 fold (53.33 μmol g–1 FW) in plants growing under 400 and 600 mM NaCl, over that in the control plants (1.86 μmol g–1 FW; Figure 4A). Similarly, the total soluble sugar were continuously accumulated in the phyllodes of salt-stressed plants and peaked to 42.1 mg g–1 DW (∼3.2 fold of control) in plants grown under 600 mM NaCl (Figure 4B). Sucrose, glucose, and fructose contents in salt-stressed plants were increased in relation to degree of salt stress. The sucrose, glucose, and fructose in plants grown under 600 mM NaCl were 2.2, 3.7, and 5.1 fold of control, respectively (Table 2). The accumulation of glucose and fructose was comparatively less in plants under 200 mM NaCl, where it increased by 2.3 and 3.6 fold, respectively, over that in the control plants.

Bottom Line: Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants.However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91).The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency , Pathum Thani, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Acacia ampliceps (salt wattle), a leguminous shrub, has been introduced in salt-affected areas in the northeast of Thailand for the remediation of saline soils. However, the defense mechanisms underlying salt tolerance A. ampliceps are unknown. We investigated various physio-biochemical and morphological attributes of A. ampliceps in response to varying levels of salt treatment (200-600 mM NaCl). Seedlings of A. ampliceps (25 ± 2 cm in plant height) raised from seeds were treated with 200 mM (mild stress), 400 and 600 mM (extreme stress) of salt treatment (NaCl) under greenhouse conditions. Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants. Free proline and soluble sugar contents in plants grown under extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl) for 9 days significantly increased by 28.7 (53.33 μmol g(-1) FW) and 3.2 (42.11 mg g(-1) DW) folds, respectively over the control, thereby playing a major role as osmotic adjustment. Na(+) enrichment in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed seedlings positively related to total chlorophyll (TC) degradation (R (2) = 0.72). Photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence in salt-stressed plants increased under mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl). However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91). The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

No MeSH data available.