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Physio-biochemical and morphological characters of halophyte legume shrub, Acacia ampliceps seedlings in response to salt stress under greenhouse.

Theerawitaya C, Tisarum R, Samphumphuang T, Singh HP - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants.However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91).The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency , Pathum Thani, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Acacia ampliceps (salt wattle), a leguminous shrub, has been introduced in salt-affected areas in the northeast of Thailand for the remediation of saline soils. However, the defense mechanisms underlying salt tolerance A. ampliceps are unknown. We investigated various physio-biochemical and morphological attributes of A. ampliceps in response to varying levels of salt treatment (200-600 mM NaCl). Seedlings of A. ampliceps (25 ± 2 cm in plant height) raised from seeds were treated with 200 mM (mild stress), 400 and 600 mM (extreme stress) of salt treatment (NaCl) under greenhouse conditions. Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants. Free proline and soluble sugar contents in plants grown under extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl) for 9 days significantly increased by 28.7 (53.33 μmol g(-1) FW) and 3.2 (42.11 mg g(-1) DW) folds, respectively over the control, thereby playing a major role as osmotic adjustment. Na(+) enrichment in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed seedlings positively related to total chlorophyll (TC) degradation (R (2) = 0.72). Photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence in salt-stressed plants increased under mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl). However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91). The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

No MeSH data available.


Na+(A), K+(B), and Ca2+ content (C) and Na+/K+ ratio (D) of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
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Figure 3: Na+(A), K+(B), and Ca2+ content (C) and Na+/K+ ratio (D) of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.

Mentions: Na+ and Ca2+ contents in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed plants were continuously enriched, whereas K+ content declined significantly, depending on the NaCl concentration in the soil solution (Figures 3A–C). Na+/K+ in the phyllode leaves exhibited a trend similar to Na enrichment when plants were subjected to salt stress (Figure 3D). Under the extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl), Na+ content in the phyllode tissues was peaked to ∼33 mg g–1 DW, thereby resulting in an increase in Na+/K+ ratio by 7.8 fold (Figure 3). In addition, Na+ and Ca2+ content in the phyllode tissues of mild salt-stressed plants (200 mM NaCl) was 16.1 and 9.5 mg g–1 DW, respectively.


Physio-biochemical and morphological characters of halophyte legume shrub, Acacia ampliceps seedlings in response to salt stress under greenhouse.

Theerawitaya C, Tisarum R, Samphumphuang T, Singh HP - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Na+(A), K+(B), and Ca2+ content (C) and Na+/K+ ratio (D) of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553901&req=5

Figure 3: Na+(A), K+(B), and Ca2+ content (C) and Na+/K+ ratio (D) of Acacia ampliceps seedlings grown under salt stress conditions for 9 days. Data presented as mean ± SE. Different letters represent significant difference at p ≤ 0.01 according to Tukey’s HSD test.
Mentions: Na+ and Ca2+ contents in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed plants were continuously enriched, whereas K+ content declined significantly, depending on the NaCl concentration in the soil solution (Figures 3A–C). Na+/K+ in the phyllode leaves exhibited a trend similar to Na enrichment when plants were subjected to salt stress (Figure 3D). Under the extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl), Na+ content in the phyllode tissues was peaked to ∼33 mg g–1 DW, thereby resulting in an increase in Na+/K+ ratio by 7.8 fold (Figure 3). In addition, Na+ and Ca2+ content in the phyllode tissues of mild salt-stressed plants (200 mM NaCl) was 16.1 and 9.5 mg g–1 DW, respectively.

Bottom Line: Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants.However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91).The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency , Pathum Thani, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Acacia ampliceps (salt wattle), a leguminous shrub, has been introduced in salt-affected areas in the northeast of Thailand for the remediation of saline soils. However, the defense mechanisms underlying salt tolerance A. ampliceps are unknown. We investigated various physio-biochemical and morphological attributes of A. ampliceps in response to varying levels of salt treatment (200-600 mM NaCl). Seedlings of A. ampliceps (25 ± 2 cm in plant height) raised from seeds were treated with 200 mM (mild stress), 400 and 600 mM (extreme stress) of salt treatment (NaCl) under greenhouse conditions. Na(+) and Ca(2+) contents in the leaf tissues increased significantly under salt treatment, whereas K(+) content declined in salt-stressed plants. Free proline and soluble sugar contents in plants grown under extreme salt stress (600 mM NaCl) for 9 days significantly increased by 28.7 (53.33 μmol g(-1) FW) and 3.2 (42.11 mg g(-1) DW) folds, respectively over the control, thereby playing a major role as osmotic adjustment. Na(+) enrichment in the phyllode tissues of salt-stressed seedlings positively related to total chlorophyll (TC) degradation (R (2) = 0.72). Photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence in salt-stressed plants increased under mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl). However, these declined under high levels of salinity (400-600 mM NaCl), consequently resulting in a reduced net photosynthetic rate (R (2) = 0.81) and plant dry weight (R (2) = 0.91). The study concludes that A. ampliceps has an osmotic adjustment and Na(+) compartmentation as effective salt defense mechanisms, and thus it could be an excellent species to grow in salt-affected soils.

No MeSH data available.