Limits...
Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases.

Altinel F, Altin C, Gezmis E, Altinors N - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits.In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy.After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Baskent, ─░zmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Axial nonenhanced computerized tomography (NECT) scan shows left frontoparietal, hypodense chronic subdural hematoma. Cortical membrane of hematoma (blue arrow), calvarial surface of hematoma (yellow arrow). (b) In postoperative axial NECT scan craniotomy defect (blue arrow) and minimal residual hematoma (yellow arrow) are seen
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553742&req=5

Figure 1: (a) Axial nonenhanced computerized tomography (NECT) scan shows left frontoparietal, hypodense chronic subdural hematoma. Cortical membrane of hematoma (blue arrow), calvarial surface of hematoma (yellow arrow). (b) In postoperative axial NECT scan craniotomy defect (blue arrow) and minimal residual hematoma (yellow arrow) are seen

Mentions: A 71-year-old male patient was admitted to our emergency unit with complaints of somnolence and progressive weakness in right upper and lower extremities. According to his medical history; he was diagnosed with coronary artery disease and since then he has been taking acetyl salicylic acid. Approximately 1 month ago, he had a minor head trauma. Due to the trauma, he had lost his consciousness for a while and since then he was having intermittent headaches. Neurological examination revealed orientation disorder (place, time, and person), confusion, lethargy, right hemiparesis more pronounced on the upper extremity. On computerized tomography (CT) hypodense CSDH (5 cm in diameter) with cortical membrane was detected on the left frontotemporal localization [Figure 1a]. Patient was referred to cardiology department for preoperative cardiac assessment. Despite medium-high cardiac risk, patient was operated and there was no complication or significant cardiac problem during and after the operation. Minimal residual hematoma was detected on CT scan postoperatively [Figure 1b].


Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases.

Altinel F, Altin C, Gezmis E, Altinors N - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jul-Sep)

(a) Axial nonenhanced computerized tomography (NECT) scan shows left frontoparietal, hypodense chronic subdural hematoma. Cortical membrane of hematoma (blue arrow), calvarial surface of hematoma (yellow arrow). (b) In postoperative axial NECT scan craniotomy defect (blue arrow) and minimal residual hematoma (yellow arrow) are seen
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553742&req=5

Figure 1: (a) Axial nonenhanced computerized tomography (NECT) scan shows left frontoparietal, hypodense chronic subdural hematoma. Cortical membrane of hematoma (blue arrow), calvarial surface of hematoma (yellow arrow). (b) In postoperative axial NECT scan craniotomy defect (blue arrow) and minimal residual hematoma (yellow arrow) are seen
Mentions: A 71-year-old male patient was admitted to our emergency unit with complaints of somnolence and progressive weakness in right upper and lower extremities. According to his medical history; he was diagnosed with coronary artery disease and since then he has been taking acetyl salicylic acid. Approximately 1 month ago, he had a minor head trauma. Due to the trauma, he had lost his consciousness for a while and since then he was having intermittent headaches. Neurological examination revealed orientation disorder (place, time, and person), confusion, lethargy, right hemiparesis more pronounced on the upper extremity. On computerized tomography (CT) hypodense CSDH (5 cm in diameter) with cortical membrane was detected on the left frontotemporal localization [Figure 1a]. Patient was referred to cardiology department for preoperative cardiac assessment. Despite medium-high cardiac risk, patient was operated and there was no complication or significant cardiac problem during and after the operation. Minimal residual hematoma was detected on CT scan postoperatively [Figure 1b].

Bottom Line: We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits.In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy.After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Baskent, ─░zmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus