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Behavioral and Reproductive Response of White Pine Weevil (Pissodes strobi) to Resistant and Susceptible Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis).

Robert JA, Bohlmann J - Insects (2010)

Bottom Line: Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack.Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia.When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. jrobert@unbc.ca.

ABSTRACT
White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi, Peck.) is a native forest insect pest in the Pacific Northwest of North America that attacks species of spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.). Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack. Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia. In this study, we characterize behavioral, physiological and reproductive responses of weevils to an extremely resistant Sitka spruce genotype (H898) in comparison to a highly susceptible genotype (Q903). The experiments relied on a large number of three-year-old clonally propagated trees and were therefore restricted to two contrasting Sitka spruce genotypes. When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Weevil ovary development on resistant and susceptible tree genotypes. The percentage weevils with low (gray bars), moderate (white bars), or mature (black bars) ovary development for each sampling day. Weevils were restricted to either resistant host trees (top) or to susceptible host trees (bottom).
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insects-01-00003-f004: Weevil ovary development on resistant and susceptible tree genotypes. The percentage weevils with low (gray bars), moderate (white bars), or mature (black bars) ovary development for each sampling day. Weevils were restricted to either resistant host trees (top) or to susceptible host trees (bottom).

Mentions: Ovary development was also different for weevils caged on either resistant or susceptible trees (Figure 4). Two days after exposure to host trees, 22% of the females on the susceptible genotype and 11% of the females on the resistant genotype contained mature eggs. By day seven, 78% of the females caged on susceptible trees contained mature eggs whereas only 25% of the females caged on resistant trees contained mature eggs. By day 14, 100% of the females caged on the susceptible trees contained mature eggs versus 89% on the resistant trees. After 21 days, 62% of the females caged on susceptible trees still contained mature eggs versus only 29% of females caged on the resistant trees.


Behavioral and Reproductive Response of White Pine Weevil (Pissodes strobi) to Resistant and Susceptible Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis).

Robert JA, Bohlmann J - Insects (2010)

Weevil ovary development on resistant and susceptible tree genotypes. The percentage weevils with low (gray bars), moderate (white bars), or mature (black bars) ovary development for each sampling day. Weevils were restricted to either resistant host trees (top) or to susceptible host trees (bottom).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553465&req=5

insects-01-00003-f004: Weevil ovary development on resistant and susceptible tree genotypes. The percentage weevils with low (gray bars), moderate (white bars), or mature (black bars) ovary development for each sampling day. Weevils were restricted to either resistant host trees (top) or to susceptible host trees (bottom).
Mentions: Ovary development was also different for weevils caged on either resistant or susceptible trees (Figure 4). Two days after exposure to host trees, 22% of the females on the susceptible genotype and 11% of the females on the resistant genotype contained mature eggs. By day seven, 78% of the females caged on susceptible trees contained mature eggs whereas only 25% of the females caged on resistant trees contained mature eggs. By day 14, 100% of the females caged on the susceptible trees contained mature eggs versus 89% on the resistant trees. After 21 days, 62% of the females caged on susceptible trees still contained mature eggs versus only 29% of females caged on the resistant trees.

Bottom Line: Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack.Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia.When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. jrobert@unbc.ca.

ABSTRACT
White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi, Peck.) is a native forest insect pest in the Pacific Northwest of North America that attacks species of spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.). Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack. Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia. In this study, we characterize behavioral, physiological and reproductive responses of weevils to an extremely resistant Sitka spruce genotype (H898) in comparison to a highly susceptible genotype (Q903). The experiments relied on a large number of three-year-old clonally propagated trees and were therefore restricted to two contrasting Sitka spruce genotypes. When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus