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Phylogeography of the Cactophilic Drosophila and Other Arthropods Associated with Cactus Necroses in the Sonoran Desert.

Pfeiler E, Markow TA - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: For most taxa studied, little genetic structure and high dispersal ability are found in populations inhabiting the mainland and Baja California peninsula regions of the Sonoran Desert, consistent with the availability of the rotting cactus microhabitat which is patchily distributed and ephemeral.Genetic evidence has also been found for historical population expansions dating to the Pleistocene and late Pliocene in several taxa.In addition, they suggest some taxa for further, and more detailed, hypothesis driven studies of speciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Unidad Guaymas, Apartado Postal 284, Guaymas, Sonora 85480, México. pfeiler@ciad.mx.

ABSTRACT
Studies on the population genetics, phylogenetic relationships, systematics and evolution of arthropods that inhabit necrotic tissue of cacti in the Sonoran Desert of North America are reviewed. These studies have focused upon several species of insects (orders Diptera and Coleoptera) and arachnids (order Pseudoscorpiones). For most taxa studied, little genetic structure and high dispersal ability are found in populations inhabiting the mainland and Baja California peninsula regions of the Sonoran Desert, consistent with the availability of the rotting cactus microhabitat which is patchily distributed and ephemeral. There is evidence, however, that the Gulf of California, which bisects the Sonoran Desert, has played a role in limiting gene flow and promoting speciation in several taxa, including histerid beetles, whereas other taxa, especially Drosophila nigrospiracula and D. mettleri, apparently are able to freely cross the Gulf, probably by taking advantage of the Midriff Islands in the northern Gulf as dispersal "stepping stones". Genetic evidence has also been found for historical population expansions dating to the Pleistocene and late Pliocene in several taxa. Overall, these studies have provided important insights into how arthropods with different life history traits, but generally restricted to a necrotic cactus microhabitat, have evolved in an environmentally harsh and tectonically active region. In addition, they suggest some taxa for further, and more detailed, hypothesis driven studies of speciation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map showing the approximate boundaries of the Sonoran Desert (shaded area) in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico. Inset is a satellite image showing details of the four major Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California: AG, Angel de la Guarda; T, Tiburon; SE, San Esteben; SL, San Lorenzo. Stippled area at the head of the Gulf shows the region of the Gran Desierto de Altar. BC, Baja California; BCS, Baja California Sur.
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f1-insects-02-00218: Map showing the approximate boundaries of the Sonoran Desert (shaded area) in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico. Inset is a satellite image showing details of the four major Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California: AG, Angel de la Guarda; T, Tiburon; SE, San Esteben; SL, San Lorenzo. Stippled area at the head of the Gulf shows the region of the Gran Desierto de Altar. BC, Baja California; BCS, Baja California Sur.

Mentions: The Sonoran Desert of North America encompasses approximately 260,000 km2 of ecologically diverse habitat in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico [1], including the southeastern portion of California and most of southern Arizona in the USA, and the states of Baja California, Baja California Sur and Sonora in Mexico (Figure 1). Although some workers consider the peninsular portion of the Sonoran Desert a separate entity [2], herein we follow the generally accepted definition in which the peninsula is included [1]. The dynamic geological history of the region, including the still active separation of the Baja California peninsula from the mainland that began in the late Miocene [3], in addition to the vast expanse of desert vegetation, make for an ideal setting to test hypotheses on the roles of vicariance and dispersal in shaping genetic differentiation and phylogeography of desert insects and other organisms.


Phylogeography of the Cactophilic Drosophila and Other Arthropods Associated with Cactus Necroses in the Sonoran Desert.

Pfeiler E, Markow TA - Insects (2011)

Map showing the approximate boundaries of the Sonoran Desert (shaded area) in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico. Inset is a satellite image showing details of the four major Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California: AG, Angel de la Guarda; T, Tiburon; SE, San Esteben; SL, San Lorenzo. Stippled area at the head of the Gulf shows the region of the Gran Desierto de Altar. BC, Baja California; BCS, Baja California Sur.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553460&req=5

f1-insects-02-00218: Map showing the approximate boundaries of the Sonoran Desert (shaded area) in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico. Inset is a satellite image showing details of the four major Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California: AG, Angel de la Guarda; T, Tiburon; SE, San Esteben; SL, San Lorenzo. Stippled area at the head of the Gulf shows the region of the Gran Desierto de Altar. BC, Baja California; BCS, Baja California Sur.
Mentions: The Sonoran Desert of North America encompasses approximately 260,000 km2 of ecologically diverse habitat in southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico [1], including the southeastern portion of California and most of southern Arizona in the USA, and the states of Baja California, Baja California Sur and Sonora in Mexico (Figure 1). Although some workers consider the peninsular portion of the Sonoran Desert a separate entity [2], herein we follow the generally accepted definition in which the peninsula is included [1]. The dynamic geological history of the region, including the still active separation of the Baja California peninsula from the mainland that began in the late Miocene [3], in addition to the vast expanse of desert vegetation, make for an ideal setting to test hypotheses on the roles of vicariance and dispersal in shaping genetic differentiation and phylogeography of desert insects and other organisms.

Bottom Line: For most taxa studied, little genetic structure and high dispersal ability are found in populations inhabiting the mainland and Baja California peninsula regions of the Sonoran Desert, consistent with the availability of the rotting cactus microhabitat which is patchily distributed and ephemeral.Genetic evidence has also been found for historical population expansions dating to the Pleistocene and late Pliocene in several taxa.In addition, they suggest some taxa for further, and more detailed, hypothesis driven studies of speciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Unidad Guaymas, Apartado Postal 284, Guaymas, Sonora 85480, México. pfeiler@ciad.mx.

ABSTRACT
Studies on the population genetics, phylogenetic relationships, systematics and evolution of arthropods that inhabit necrotic tissue of cacti in the Sonoran Desert of North America are reviewed. These studies have focused upon several species of insects (orders Diptera and Coleoptera) and arachnids (order Pseudoscorpiones). For most taxa studied, little genetic structure and high dispersal ability are found in populations inhabiting the mainland and Baja California peninsula regions of the Sonoran Desert, consistent with the availability of the rotting cactus microhabitat which is patchily distributed and ephemeral. There is evidence, however, that the Gulf of California, which bisects the Sonoran Desert, has played a role in limiting gene flow and promoting speciation in several taxa, including histerid beetles, whereas other taxa, especially Drosophila nigrospiracula and D. mettleri, apparently are able to freely cross the Gulf, probably by taking advantage of the Midriff Islands in the northern Gulf as dispersal "stepping stones". Genetic evidence has also been found for historical population expansions dating to the Pleistocene and late Pliocene in several taxa. Overall, these studies have provided important insights into how arthropods with different life history traits, but generally restricted to a necrotic cactus microhabitat, have evolved in an environmentally harsh and tectonically active region. In addition, they suggest some taxa for further, and more detailed, hypothesis driven studies of speciation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus