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Speciation, Divergence, and the Origin of Gryllus rubens: Behavior, Morphology, and Molecules.

Gray DA - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions.This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule.The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330, USA. dave.gray@csun.edu.

ABSTRACT
The last 25 years or so has seen a huge resurgence of interest in speciation research. This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions. Here I review about a decade of work on the sister species of field crickets Gryllus texensis and G. rubens. This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule. The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

No MeSH data available.


Female responsiveness to males in sequential mating trials in which the first male was a conspecific, and the second male was either a conspecific or heterospecific.
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f4-insects-02-00195: Female responsiveness to males in sequential mating trials in which the first male was a conspecific, and the second male was either a conspecific or heterospecific.

Mentions: The second courtship study we conducted was motivated by the idea that females may control paternity via selectively re-mating. Female crickets generally are polyandrous [53–63] and G. texensis is no exception [64]. Because sperm competition in these crickets favors the last male to mate (average paternity of the second male to mate in a study of G. texensis was 72% [65]), females first mated to a conspecific should be very reluctant to engage in a second mating with a heterospecific. Our results somewhat supported these predictions [66], but differed in some interesting and suggestive ways. Males of both species courted females of both species at equal rates [66], as I had found for G. texensis males in my previous study [52]; G. rubens males had preferentially courted conspecifics in that study. G. texensis females basically met our predictions: upon first exposure to males, female G. texensis preferred conspecific males, and they preferred conspecific males following exposure to conspecific males, i.e., they were unwilling to ‘trade-down’ to heterospecific males. Choosiness was relaxed following first exposure to heterospecific males. Female G. rubens, however, appeared to prefer heterospecific males upon either first or subsequent exposure. Results for both species are summarized in Figure 4. The lack of choosiness in G. rubens we interpreted in light of a Kaneshiro effect and what we then knew about their evolutionary history (see below).


Speciation, Divergence, and the Origin of Gryllus rubens: Behavior, Morphology, and Molecules.

Gray DA - Insects (2011)

Female responsiveness to males in sequential mating trials in which the first male was a conspecific, and the second male was either a conspecific or heterospecific.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553458&req=5

f4-insects-02-00195: Female responsiveness to males in sequential mating trials in which the first male was a conspecific, and the second male was either a conspecific or heterospecific.
Mentions: The second courtship study we conducted was motivated by the idea that females may control paternity via selectively re-mating. Female crickets generally are polyandrous [53–63] and G. texensis is no exception [64]. Because sperm competition in these crickets favors the last male to mate (average paternity of the second male to mate in a study of G. texensis was 72% [65]), females first mated to a conspecific should be very reluctant to engage in a second mating with a heterospecific. Our results somewhat supported these predictions [66], but differed in some interesting and suggestive ways. Males of both species courted females of both species at equal rates [66], as I had found for G. texensis males in my previous study [52]; G. rubens males had preferentially courted conspecifics in that study. G. texensis females basically met our predictions: upon first exposure to males, female G. texensis preferred conspecific males, and they preferred conspecific males following exposure to conspecific males, i.e., they were unwilling to ‘trade-down’ to heterospecific males. Choosiness was relaxed following first exposure to heterospecific males. Female G. rubens, however, appeared to prefer heterospecific males upon either first or subsequent exposure. Results for both species are summarized in Figure 4. The lack of choosiness in G. rubens we interpreted in light of a Kaneshiro effect and what we then knew about their evolutionary history (see below).

Bottom Line: This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions.This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule.The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330, USA. dave.gray@csun.edu.

ABSTRACT
The last 25 years or so has seen a huge resurgence of interest in speciation research. This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions. Here I review about a decade of work on the sister species of field crickets Gryllus texensis and G. rubens. This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule. The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

No MeSH data available.