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Speciation, Divergence, and the Origin of Gryllus rubens: Behavior, Morphology, and Molecules.

Gray DA - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions.This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule.The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330, USA. dave.gray@csun.edu.

ABSTRACT
The last 25 years or so has seen a huge resurgence of interest in speciation research. This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions. Here I review about a decade of work on the sister species of field crickets Gryllus texensis and G. rubens. This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule. The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

No MeSH data available.


Pulse rates in the calling songs of males (corrected to a common temperature) are strongly bimodal and show almost no overlap; laboratory produced hybrids are intermediate.
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f1-insects-02-00195: Pulse rates in the calling songs of males (corrected to a common temperature) are strongly bimodal and show almost no overlap; laboratory produced hybrids are intermediate.

Mentions: Detailed methodology is provided in [25], but basically what we did was collect adult females from throughout the range of G. texensis, bring those females into the lab, and rear each female's offspring separately. After adult eclosion we recorded the calling songs of males, and we tested females' responses to variation in song. Thus for each wild-caught female we obtained pulse rate data from her sons, and female preference for pulse rate data from her daughters. From these data, for G. texensis, we were able to show (1) that male pulse rate has heritable genetic variation, with h2 roughly 40%, (2) that female preference for pulse rate also has heritable genetic variation, ca. 38%, (3) that there was a significant genetic correlation between male pulse rate and female preference for pulse rate, rG = 0.49, and (4) that neither male song nor female preference for song differed across the geographic range in a way consistent with reproductive character displacement—there was in fact strikingly little geographic variation in G. texensis song and preference. At the time we did not collect enough G. rubens to conduct a parallel test in that species, but subsequent work has shown that G. rubens also lacks reproductive character displacement in male calling song [26] and that extensive field collections show strongly bimodal nearly non-overlapping pulse rates (Figure 1).


Speciation, Divergence, and the Origin of Gryllus rubens: Behavior, Morphology, and Molecules.

Gray DA - Insects (2011)

Pulse rates in the calling songs of males (corrected to a common temperature) are strongly bimodal and show almost no overlap; laboratory produced hybrids are intermediate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553458&req=5

f1-insects-02-00195: Pulse rates in the calling songs of males (corrected to a common temperature) are strongly bimodal and show almost no overlap; laboratory produced hybrids are intermediate.
Mentions: Detailed methodology is provided in [25], but basically what we did was collect adult females from throughout the range of G. texensis, bring those females into the lab, and rear each female's offspring separately. After adult eclosion we recorded the calling songs of males, and we tested females' responses to variation in song. Thus for each wild-caught female we obtained pulse rate data from her sons, and female preference for pulse rate data from her daughters. From these data, for G. texensis, we were able to show (1) that male pulse rate has heritable genetic variation, with h2 roughly 40%, (2) that female preference for pulse rate also has heritable genetic variation, ca. 38%, (3) that there was a significant genetic correlation between male pulse rate and female preference for pulse rate, rG = 0.49, and (4) that neither male song nor female preference for song differed across the geographic range in a way consistent with reproductive character displacement—there was in fact strikingly little geographic variation in G. texensis song and preference. At the time we did not collect enough G. rubens to conduct a parallel test in that species, but subsequent work has shown that G. rubens also lacks reproductive character displacement in male calling song [26] and that extensive field collections show strongly bimodal nearly non-overlapping pulse rates (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions.This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule.The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330, USA. dave.gray@csun.edu.

ABSTRACT
The last 25 years or so has seen a huge resurgence of interest in speciation research. This has coincided with the development and widespread use of new tools in molecular genetics, especially DNA sequencing, to inform ecological and evolutionary questions. Here I review about a decade of work on the sister species of field crickets Gryllus texensis and G. rubens. This work has included analysis of morphology, behavior, and the mitochondrial DNA molecule. The molecular work in particular has dramatically re-shaped my interpretation of the speciational history of these taxa, suggesting that rather than 'sister' species we should consider these taxa as 'mother-daughter' species with G. rubens derived from within a subset of ancestral G. texensis.

No MeSH data available.