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Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.


ArcGIS Map of terrestrial invertebrate occurrence records and ice-free terrain [104,105]. Areas shaded in black represent the ice-free terrain where no terrestrial invertebrate collections have been made; red triangles illustrate all springtail records while green circles illustrate all other terrestrial invertebrate records.
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f3-insects-02-00062: ArcGIS Map of terrestrial invertebrate occurrence records and ice-free terrain [104,105]. Areas shaded in black represent the ice-free terrain where no terrestrial invertebrate collections have been made; red triangles illustrate all springtail records while green circles illustrate all other terrestrial invertebrate records.

Mentions: For much of the Antarctic biota, survey data is limiting or completely lacking ([26,32,33], see Figure 3), and as we have shown here, large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups. However, accurate phylogeographic hypotheses require sampling across entire species ranges. While sampling effort in Antarctica has been greatest for the microarthropods [26], the springtail Go. hodgsoni from continental southern Victoria Land is the only species for which we can reliably say this level of sampling has been achieved ([49], and references therein). Thus, the underlying future directive of Antarctic phylogeography must be to sample species across as wider proportion of their geographic range as possible. In addition, some large important biogeographic ice-free areas remain unsampled for any species (see Figure 3). Thus, there are currently no data from inland locations of the Antarctic Peninsula, including several areas thought to be most similar to the outer regions of continental Antarctica [51]. Sampling of these and other ice-free locations (e.g., [19,32]) would be beneficial for further assessment of how regional differences may have influenced distinct evolutionary histories in local taxa.


Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

ArcGIS Map of terrestrial invertebrate occurrence records and ice-free terrain [104,105]. Areas shaded in black represent the ice-free terrain where no terrestrial invertebrate collections have been made; red triangles illustrate all springtail records while green circles illustrate all other terrestrial invertebrate records.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553450&req=5

f3-insects-02-00062: ArcGIS Map of terrestrial invertebrate occurrence records and ice-free terrain [104,105]. Areas shaded in black represent the ice-free terrain where no terrestrial invertebrate collections have been made; red triangles illustrate all springtail records while green circles illustrate all other terrestrial invertebrate records.
Mentions: For much of the Antarctic biota, survey data is limiting or completely lacking ([26,32,33], see Figure 3), and as we have shown here, large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups. However, accurate phylogeographic hypotheses require sampling across entire species ranges. While sampling effort in Antarctica has been greatest for the microarthropods [26], the springtail Go. hodgsoni from continental southern Victoria Land is the only species for which we can reliably say this level of sampling has been achieved ([49], and references therein). Thus, the underlying future directive of Antarctic phylogeography must be to sample species across as wider proportion of their geographic range as possible. In addition, some large important biogeographic ice-free areas remain unsampled for any species (see Figure 3). Thus, there are currently no data from inland locations of the Antarctic Peninsula, including several areas thought to be most similar to the outer regions of continental Antarctica [51]. Sampling of these and other ice-free locations (e.g., [19,32]) would be beneficial for further assessment of how regional differences may have influenced distinct evolutionary histories in local taxa.

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.