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Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Figure showing the phylogeographic sampling that has been achieved for four Antarctic springtail species across their distributional ranges (as indicated by vertical lines beneath/above species names). The codes used in the two inset boxes are location codes and refer to potential refugial locations for each species as referred to in the respective publications and Table 1. Dashed line in the inset boxes indicate heavy or fine biogeographic breaks among regions and in many cases also represent major glacial systems. See text for further details.
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f2-insects-02-00062: Figure showing the phylogeographic sampling that has been achieved for four Antarctic springtail species across their distributional ranges (as indicated by vertical lines beneath/above species names). The codes used in the two inset boxes are location codes and refer to potential refugial locations for each species as referred to in the respective publications and Table 1. Dashed line in the inset boxes indicate heavy or fine biogeographic breaks among regions and in many cases also represent major glacial systems. See text for further details.

Mentions: Continental Antarctica is a cold, polar desert [55], home to a few vast ice-free areas, the largest of which—the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land—occupies around 40,000 km2 [21]. Much of the phylogeographic work on the continent has centered on Victoria Land (Figure 2), and will subsequently form the bulk of our focus here.


Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

Figure showing the phylogeographic sampling that has been achieved for four Antarctic springtail species across their distributional ranges (as indicated by vertical lines beneath/above species names). The codes used in the two inset boxes are location codes and refer to potential refugial locations for each species as referred to in the respective publications and Table 1. Dashed line in the inset boxes indicate heavy or fine biogeographic breaks among regions and in many cases also represent major glacial systems. See text for further details.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553450&req=5

f2-insects-02-00062: Figure showing the phylogeographic sampling that has been achieved for four Antarctic springtail species across their distributional ranges (as indicated by vertical lines beneath/above species names). The codes used in the two inset boxes are location codes and refer to potential refugial locations for each species as referred to in the respective publications and Table 1. Dashed line in the inset boxes indicate heavy or fine biogeographic breaks among regions and in many cases also represent major glacial systems. See text for further details.
Mentions: Continental Antarctica is a cold, polar desert [55], home to a few vast ice-free areas, the largest of which—the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land—occupies around 40,000 km2 [21]. Much of the phylogeographic work on the continent has centered on Victoria Land (Figure 2), and will subsequently form the bulk of our focus here.

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus