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Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.


Map showing the different Antarctic zones and locations referred to in the text. Each zone is indicated by colour: yellow corresponds to sub-Antarctica, white to maritime Antarctica, and grey to continental Antarctica. In addition, the ‘Gressitt Line’ is shown at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula(see text).
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f1-insects-02-00062: Map showing the different Antarctic zones and locations referred to in the text. Each zone is indicated by colour: yellow corresponds to sub-Antarctica, white to maritime Antarctica, and grey to continental Antarctica. In addition, the ‘Gressitt Line’ is shown at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula(see text).

Mentions: Indeed, there are three generally accepted demarcation zones in Antarctica—discrete in the nature of their resident flora and fauna, their tectonic characteristics, their ecosystems, their biogeographic legacies and their climatic profiles [21,32,41–43]. These zones correspond to the sub-Antarctic (consisting of a ring of islands that surround the continent, including Macquarie Island, South Georgia, Marion Island, Îles Crozet, Îles Kerguelen and Heard and Macdonald Islands), the maritime Antarctic (including the South Shetland Islands, South Sandwich Islands, Bouvetøya the South Orkney Islands and the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula), and the continental Antarctic, which includes the rest of the continent [44–46] (Figure 1). As one moves from the outer (sub-Antarctic) to the inner (continental Antarctic) zones, the climate becomes drier and cooler, and the active season (i.e., the period pertinent to terrestrial biota), shorter (< 1 or 2 months at inland locations/up to 12 months in the sub-Antarctic).


Extreme Glacial Legacies: A Synthesis of the Antarctic Springtail Phylogeographic Record.

McGaughran A, Stevens MI, Hogg ID, Carapelli A - Insects (2011)

Map showing the different Antarctic zones and locations referred to in the text. Each zone is indicated by colour: yellow corresponds to sub-Antarctica, white to maritime Antarctica, and grey to continental Antarctica. In addition, the ‘Gressitt Line’ is shown at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula(see text).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553450&req=5

f1-insects-02-00062: Map showing the different Antarctic zones and locations referred to in the text. Each zone is indicated by colour: yellow corresponds to sub-Antarctica, white to maritime Antarctica, and grey to continental Antarctica. In addition, the ‘Gressitt Line’ is shown at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula(see text).
Mentions: Indeed, there are three generally accepted demarcation zones in Antarctica—discrete in the nature of their resident flora and fauna, their tectonic characteristics, their ecosystems, their biogeographic legacies and their climatic profiles [21,32,41–43]. These zones correspond to the sub-Antarctic (consisting of a ring of islands that surround the continent, including Macquarie Island, South Georgia, Marion Island, Îles Crozet, Îles Kerguelen and Heard and Macdonald Islands), the maritime Antarctic (including the South Shetland Islands, South Sandwich Islands, Bouvetøya the South Orkney Islands and the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula), and the continental Antarctic, which includes the rest of the continent [44–46] (Figure 1). As one moves from the outer (sub-Antarctic) to the inner (continental Antarctic) zones, the climate becomes drier and cooler, and the active season (i.e., the period pertinent to terrestrial biota), shorter (< 1 or 2 months at inland locations/up to 12 months in the sub-Antarctic).

Bottom Line: We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales.Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions.We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department for Evolutionary Biology, Spemannstr. 37-39/IV, Tübingen, D-72076, Germany. ang.mcgaughran@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
We review current phylogeographic knowledge from across the Antarctic terrestrial landscape with a focus on springtail taxa. We describe consistent patterns of high genetic diversity and structure among populations which have persisted in glacial refugia across Antarctica over both short (10 Mya) timescales. Despite a general concordance of results among species, we explain why location is important in determining population genetic patterns within bioregions. We complete our review by drawing attention to the main limitations in the field of Antarctic phylogeography, namely that the scope of geographic focus is often lacking within studies, and that large gaps remain in our phylogeographic knowledge for most terrestrial groups.

No MeSH data available.