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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

One of the Bergdorf-Goodman storefront windows on Fifth Avenue.
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f14-insects-02-00564: One of the Bergdorf-Goodman storefront windows on Fifth Avenue.

Mentions: Haute Couture Moths? Some may have legs as slender as those of catwalk models, but a rare group of moths confronted passersby from the world-famous displays inside the five giant Bergdorf-Goodman windows facing Fifth Avenue in downtown New York City during 2010. It was a display by artist Joseph Scheer displaying his six-legged treasures (Figure 14). I imagine more than one person stopped to reflect and wonder what was going on. Is that a giant bug? What is it doing? I never realized they were so beautiful.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

One of the Bergdorf-Goodman storefront windows on Fifth Avenue.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f14-insects-02-00564: One of the Bergdorf-Goodman storefront windows on Fifth Avenue.
Mentions: Haute Couture Moths? Some may have legs as slender as those of catwalk models, but a rare group of moths confronted passersby from the world-famous displays inside the five giant Bergdorf-Goodman windows facing Fifth Avenue in downtown New York City during 2010. It was a display by artist Joseph Scheer displaying his six-legged treasures (Figure 14). I imagine more than one person stopped to reflect and wonder what was going on. Is that a giant bug? What is it doing? I never realized they were so beautiful.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus