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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chalo, a Mayo indian craftsman shakes and inspects a string of Rothschildia cocoons for just the right sound, effectively “tuning” the rattles.
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f12-insects-02-00564: Chalo, a Mayo indian craftsman shakes and inspects a string of Rothschildia cocoons for just the right sound, effectively “tuning” the rattles.

Mentions: The old man deftly selected which cocoons to use, favoring most but rejecting others (Figure 12). He did something else. Nearby was a small gourd bowl containing tiny white stones about the size of grains of wheat. He added five or more stones to each half cocoon, front and back before tying them to the main axis. He held them up to his ear and shook them, testing the sound from each. Often, he removed stones and replaced them with others, getting the “chhhit chhitt chhitt chhitt” sound just right. I learned from Joseph that these were no ordinary stones, and they had an odd entomological connection. Another insect order was involved. The rattle maker, Chalo, had gone outside the village and located nests of the painful stinging ants, seed harvesters or “pogos” (the genus Pogonomyrmex) and raided their tumuli, the trash and excavation dumps left by the ants. The ants seem to select similar-sized stones to fashion their crater nests. These made the rattle sounds inside the ténaborim. I was amazed to learn this other secret of the Mayo from Joseph. Michael and Joseph learned about other plants and animals from the Mayo including some of the food plants for their beloved silkmoths.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Chalo, a Mayo indian craftsman shakes and inspects a string of Rothschildia cocoons for just the right sound, effectively “tuning” the rattles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f12-insects-02-00564: Chalo, a Mayo indian craftsman shakes and inspects a string of Rothschildia cocoons for just the right sound, effectively “tuning” the rattles.
Mentions: The old man deftly selected which cocoons to use, favoring most but rejecting others (Figure 12). He did something else. Nearby was a small gourd bowl containing tiny white stones about the size of grains of wheat. He added five or more stones to each half cocoon, front and back before tying them to the main axis. He held them up to his ear and shook them, testing the sound from each. Often, he removed stones and replaced them with others, getting the “chhhit chhitt chhitt chhitt” sound just right. I learned from Joseph that these were no ordinary stones, and they had an odd entomological connection. Another insect order was involved. The rattle maker, Chalo, had gone outside the village and located nests of the painful stinging ants, seed harvesters or “pogos” (the genus Pogonomyrmex) and raided their tumuli, the trash and excavation dumps left by the ants. The ants seem to select similar-sized stones to fashion their crater nests. These made the rattle sounds inside the ténaborim. I was amazed to learn this other secret of the Mayo from Joseph. Michael and Joseph learned about other plants and animals from the Mayo including some of the food plants for their beloved silkmoths.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus