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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mayo Pascola dancer, Masiaca, 2011. The dancer is wearing Rothschildia cocoons, known as ténaborim.
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f11-insects-02-00564: Mayo Pascola dancer, Masiaca, 2011. The dancer is wearing Rothschildia cocoons, known as ténaborim.

Mentions: Scheer encountered a Mayo elder and healer living in Techive who was an expert at fashioning the deer dancer leg rattles from moth cocoons. It was his specialty, and everyone came to him for their strands. In the deer dances, the main dancer (wearing a deer headdress and shaking gourd rattles) also produces music from a belt made from spent brass ammunition cartridges or dried deer hooves. Other dancers including the Fariseos wear ankle rattles. The cocoon rattles are doubled over and tied to long strings. A really long string might have 400 cocoons and circle the ankle at the foot extending to just below the knees. The deer dancers stamp out mesmerizing beats almost like the buzz of a rattlesnake shaking out its warning (Figure 11). The cocoons are the tough silken pupal cases that protect silk moths during their long wait until emergence as adults on their quest to mate. The preferred cocoons gathered by the Mayo men in the wild are attached to dried plant stems. They belong to a gorgeous species of Sonoran silk moth, Rothschildia cincta (Figure 7). They are gathered by the hundreds and brought to the village rattle maker. The Mayo allows the male and female moths to emerge from their cocoons to fly back into the desert, assuring their conservation, and a continued supply of Mayo musical instruments.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Mayo Pascola dancer, Masiaca, 2011. The dancer is wearing Rothschildia cocoons, known as ténaborim.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f11-insects-02-00564: Mayo Pascola dancer, Masiaca, 2011. The dancer is wearing Rothschildia cocoons, known as ténaborim.
Mentions: Scheer encountered a Mayo elder and healer living in Techive who was an expert at fashioning the deer dancer leg rattles from moth cocoons. It was his specialty, and everyone came to him for their strands. In the deer dances, the main dancer (wearing a deer headdress and shaking gourd rattles) also produces music from a belt made from spent brass ammunition cartridges or dried deer hooves. Other dancers including the Fariseos wear ankle rattles. The cocoon rattles are doubled over and tied to long strings. A really long string might have 400 cocoons and circle the ankle at the foot extending to just below the knees. The deer dancers stamp out mesmerizing beats almost like the buzz of a rattlesnake shaking out its warning (Figure 11). The cocoons are the tough silken pupal cases that protect silk moths during their long wait until emergence as adults on their quest to mate. The preferred cocoons gathered by the Mayo men in the wild are attached to dried plant stems. They belong to a gorgeous species of Sonoran silk moth, Rothschildia cincta (Figure 7). They are gathered by the hundreds and brought to the village rattle maker. The Mayo allows the male and female moths to emerge from their cocoons to fly back into the desert, assuring their conservation, and a continued supply of Mayo musical instruments.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus