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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Another brightly colored Arizona tiger moth, Arachnis picta.
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f9-insects-02-00564: Another brightly colored Arizona tiger moth, Arachnis picta.

Mentions: For the past 5 years Joseph Scheer has made extensive visits to Arizona, making Tucson his base camp and organizing collecting expeditions around southern Arizona's canyons and into Northern Mexico, across the state of Sonora. These field trips were facilitated by local botanist and silk moth expert Michael Wilson, Director of the Tucson-based non-profit, the Drylands Institute [6] a decades old publisher of scholarly botanical books on the AZ/Mexico borderlands. As Drylands board president I've also been involved on many of these field trips and for logistical support while Scheer was in Tucson. These early mothing trips were exciting, and Scheer was amazed at the diversity of moths of all kinds, including the giant silkmoths, Citheronia splendens (Figure 5) and Copaxa lavandera (Figure 6), or Rothschildia cincta (Figure 7) of the Sonoran desert. Some of the other flamboyant moths collected during these expeditions included giant tiger moths Dysschema howardi (Figure 8) and equally striking Arachnis picta (Figure 9) or the long-tongued Manduca ochus (Figure 10). Many of the Sonoran moths were exhibited as large Iris prints by Scheer on a return trip to UNAM in Hermosillo, Sonora. An opening and evening talk on November 22, 2011 was followed by a temporary exhibit of his work during the all important study year.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Another brightly colored Arizona tiger moth, Arachnis picta.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f9-insects-02-00564: Another brightly colored Arizona tiger moth, Arachnis picta.
Mentions: For the past 5 years Joseph Scheer has made extensive visits to Arizona, making Tucson his base camp and organizing collecting expeditions around southern Arizona's canyons and into Northern Mexico, across the state of Sonora. These field trips were facilitated by local botanist and silk moth expert Michael Wilson, Director of the Tucson-based non-profit, the Drylands Institute [6] a decades old publisher of scholarly botanical books on the AZ/Mexico borderlands. As Drylands board president I've also been involved on many of these field trips and for logistical support while Scheer was in Tucson. These early mothing trips were exciting, and Scheer was amazed at the diversity of moths of all kinds, including the giant silkmoths, Citheronia splendens (Figure 5) and Copaxa lavandera (Figure 6), or Rothschildia cincta (Figure 7) of the Sonoran desert. Some of the other flamboyant moths collected during these expeditions included giant tiger moths Dysschema howardi (Figure 8) and equally striking Arachnis picta (Figure 9) or the long-tongued Manduca ochus (Figure 10). Many of the Sonoran moths were exhibited as large Iris prints by Scheer on a return trip to UNAM in Hermosillo, Sonora. An opening and evening talk on November 22, 2011 was followed by a temporary exhibit of his work during the all important study year.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus