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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Freshly-collected moths in containers ready for spreading then scanning.
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f3-insects-02-00564: Freshly-collected moths in containers ready for spreading then scanning.

Mentions: Moths are rarely collected with an insect net at the sheet. Joseph Scheer and other moth collectors usually have a number of wide-mouthed metal screw cap glass jars with Plaster of Paris bottoms at the ready. The plaster is charged at the start of each night with killing fluid, usually a big dose of ethyl acetate. This is the routine way to get the small moths. You spot a moth on the sheet you want, and approach it with the jar and quickly replace the lid. If you put the largest heavy-bodied moths like hawk moths (Sphingidae) or silk moths (Saturniidae) into a regular ethyl acetate killing jar, it will trash the other specimens, knocking off myriad wing scales on the smaller specimens. The larger moths are usually individually injected with ethanol and placed inside glassine envelopes or the plastic boxes to retain their pristine wing conditions for scanning. The night's catch is layered between soft tissue papers in plastic sandwich boxes (Figures 2 and 3) or similar containers and placed in a refrigerated cooler for the ride home. Joseph would often take stock of the night's catch laid out in open-topped boxes the next morning (Figure 3). If moths are not spread the next day, they are often frozen until they can be processed, days, weeks or months later. Freezing preserves their delicate colors and internal moisture. Some moth collectors also wear earplugs, not because the sound of thousands of moth wings is especially loud, but to keep the pesky creatures, or beetles or other flying insects, from mistakenly entering their ears and climbing toward their eardrums with horrifyingly loud sounds and discomfort. Joseph Scheer and Michael Wilson have both experienced this agony while mothing at the lights. Several entomologists have had to visit physicians to have their temporary ear canal resident evicted.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Freshly-collected moths in containers ready for spreading then scanning.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f3-insects-02-00564: Freshly-collected moths in containers ready for spreading then scanning.
Mentions: Moths are rarely collected with an insect net at the sheet. Joseph Scheer and other moth collectors usually have a number of wide-mouthed metal screw cap glass jars with Plaster of Paris bottoms at the ready. The plaster is charged at the start of each night with killing fluid, usually a big dose of ethyl acetate. This is the routine way to get the small moths. You spot a moth on the sheet you want, and approach it with the jar and quickly replace the lid. If you put the largest heavy-bodied moths like hawk moths (Sphingidae) or silk moths (Saturniidae) into a regular ethyl acetate killing jar, it will trash the other specimens, knocking off myriad wing scales on the smaller specimens. The larger moths are usually individually injected with ethanol and placed inside glassine envelopes or the plastic boxes to retain their pristine wing conditions for scanning. The night's catch is layered between soft tissue papers in plastic sandwich boxes (Figures 2 and 3) or similar containers and placed in a refrigerated cooler for the ride home. Joseph would often take stock of the night's catch laid out in open-topped boxes the next morning (Figure 3). If moths are not spread the next day, they are often frozen until they can be processed, days, weeks or months later. Freezing preserves their delicate colors and internal moisture. Some moth collectors also wear earplugs, not because the sound of thousands of moth wings is especially loud, but to keep the pesky creatures, or beetles or other flying insects, from mistakenly entering their ears and climbing toward their eardrums with horrifyingly loud sounds and discomfort. Joseph Scheer and Michael Wilson have both experienced this agony while mothing at the lights. Several entomologists have had to visit physicians to have their temporary ear canal resident evicted.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus