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Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A good night mothing in Sonora. Moths of every description blanket the collecting sheet and their combined weight is starting to collapse the apparatus.
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f2-insects-02-00564: A good night mothing in Sonora. Moths of every description blanket the collecting sheet and their combined weight is starting to collapse the apparatus.

Mentions: Moth collectors venture into remote areas with camping gear and automotive batteries or noisy and smelly gasoline-powered 110 V generators, mini power plants to energize one or more light bulbs. The choice of bulb type is usually a 400 or 800 Watt mercury vapor light bulb. Collectors should probably wear sunglasses or protective UV-glasses around these bulbs, they are that bright. They shine with not only all the visible wavelengths of light but a lot of light in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum which is strongly attractive to flying insects, especially moths. Some moth collectors also run short or long wave cylindrical black light fluorescent bulbs, but most now prefer the mercury vapor lamps. The lamp bulb, or two of them, are hung from a taut rope and placed one or two feet from the upper area of the white linen moth sheet. Thus, moths, beetles, flies, wasps and other insects can approach the sheet from opposite directions. The sheet is kept taught and at the bottom, about a foot or two of the cloth is formed into an ā€œLā€ or foot and typically weighted down with medium-sized rocks. Moths and other insects fly toward the light, swirl around the bulb for a few minutes and typically land on the vertical face of the sheet, the foot, or somewhere in the near darkness within 10 or 20 feet of the lighted area. The pattern of moths resting on a sheet or nearby, and flying around the light is shown in Figure 2.


Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

Buchmann SL - Insects (2011)

A good night mothing in Sonora. Moths of every description blanket the collecting sheet and their combined weight is starting to collapse the apparatus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553449&req=5

f2-insects-02-00564: A good night mothing in Sonora. Moths of every description blanket the collecting sheet and their combined weight is starting to collapse the apparatus.
Mentions: Moth collectors venture into remote areas with camping gear and automotive batteries or noisy and smelly gasoline-powered 110 V generators, mini power plants to energize one or more light bulbs. The choice of bulb type is usually a 400 or 800 Watt mercury vapor light bulb. Collectors should probably wear sunglasses or protective UV-glasses around these bulbs, they are that bright. They shine with not only all the visible wavelengths of light but a lot of light in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum which is strongly attractive to flying insects, especially moths. Some moth collectors also run short or long wave cylindrical black light fluorescent bulbs, but most now prefer the mercury vapor lamps. The lamp bulb, or two of them, are hung from a taut rope and placed one or two feet from the upper area of the white linen moth sheet. Thus, moths, beetles, flies, wasps and other insects can approach the sheet from opposite directions. The sheet is kept taught and at the bottom, about a foot or two of the cloth is formed into an ā€œLā€ or foot and typically weighted down with medium-sized rocks. Moths and other insects fly toward the light, swirl around the bulb for a few minutes and typically land on the vertical face of the sheet, the foot, or somewhere in the near darkness within 10 or 20 feet of the lighted area. The pattern of moths resting on a sheet or nearby, and flying around the light is shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described.Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture.The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Entomology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85743, USA. buchmann.stephen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus