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Seasonal and Daily Patterns in Activity of the Western Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Hagen).

Lewis V, Leighton S, Tabuchi R, Haverty M - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Termite activity was greater during the warmer summer months compared to the cooler winter months.Seasonal and daily fluctuations in termite activity were significantly associated with temperature, whereas humidity did not appear to have a noticeable effect on termite activity.Possible mechanisms that drive the seasonal and daily cycles in termite activity, as measured by AE technology, and the possible implications for inspections and post-treatment analysis are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

ABSTRACT
Activity of colonies of the western drywood termite, Incisitermes minor, was measured with acoustic emission (AE) technology in five loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) logs. Termite activity, whether it was feeding, excavation or movement, was monitored for 11 months under ambient conditions in a small wooden structure maintained at the University of California Richmond Field Station. AE, temperature, and humidity data were measured in 3-minute increments. Termite activity was greater during the warmer summer months compared to the cooler winter months. Termites in all five logs displayed a similar daily cycle of activity, peaking in the late afternoon. Seasonal and daily fluctuations in termite activity were significantly associated with temperature, whereas humidity did not appear to have a noticeable effect on termite activity. Possible mechanisms that drive the seasonal and daily cycles in termite activity, as measured by AE technology, and the possible implications for inspections and post-treatment analysis are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A continuous record of the acoustic emission (AE) ring down count for each sensor (1–5), from 15 June 2008 to 15 May 2009, displays a seasonal cycle. The AE ring down counts for the untreated checks (sensors 6 and 7), logs with no live termites, are displayed for comparison.
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f1-insects-02-00555: A continuous record of the acoustic emission (AE) ring down count for each sensor (1–5), from 15 June 2008 to 15 May 2009, displays a seasonal cycle. The AE ring down counts for the untreated checks (sensors 6 and 7), logs with no live termites, are displayed for comparison.

Mentions: Seasonally, AE ring down counts displayed a non-linear pattern of increasing and decreasing values associated with temperature (Figures 1 and 2). Termite activity was highest during the warmer spring and summer months compared to winter. However, an increase in daytime temperature or a sudden heat wave, even in January and February 2009, resulted in a burst of termite activity (Figures 1 and 2). Humidity did not appear to have a significant impact on termite activity during the 11-month study.


Seasonal and Daily Patterns in Activity of the Western Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Hagen).

Lewis V, Leighton S, Tabuchi R, Haverty M - Insects (2011)

A continuous record of the acoustic emission (AE) ring down count for each sensor (1–5), from 15 June 2008 to 15 May 2009, displays a seasonal cycle. The AE ring down counts for the untreated checks (sensors 6 and 7), logs with no live termites, are displayed for comparison.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553448&req=5

f1-insects-02-00555: A continuous record of the acoustic emission (AE) ring down count for each sensor (1–5), from 15 June 2008 to 15 May 2009, displays a seasonal cycle. The AE ring down counts for the untreated checks (sensors 6 and 7), logs with no live termites, are displayed for comparison.
Mentions: Seasonally, AE ring down counts displayed a non-linear pattern of increasing and decreasing values associated with temperature (Figures 1 and 2). Termite activity was highest during the warmer spring and summer months compared to winter. However, an increase in daytime temperature or a sudden heat wave, even in January and February 2009, resulted in a burst of termite activity (Figures 1 and 2). Humidity did not appear to have a significant impact on termite activity during the 11-month study.

Bottom Line: Termite activity was greater during the warmer summer months compared to the cooler winter months.Seasonal and daily fluctuations in termite activity were significantly associated with temperature, whereas humidity did not appear to have a noticeable effect on termite activity.Possible mechanisms that drive the seasonal and daily cycles in termite activity, as measured by AE technology, and the possible implications for inspections and post-treatment analysis are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

ABSTRACT
Activity of colonies of the western drywood termite, Incisitermes minor, was measured with acoustic emission (AE) technology in five loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) logs. Termite activity, whether it was feeding, excavation or movement, was monitored for 11 months under ambient conditions in a small wooden structure maintained at the University of California Richmond Field Station. AE, temperature, and humidity data were measured in 3-minute increments. Termite activity was greater during the warmer summer months compared to the cooler winter months. Termites in all five logs displayed a similar daily cycle of activity, peaking in the late afternoon. Seasonal and daily fluctuations in termite activity were significantly associated with temperature, whereas humidity did not appear to have a noticeable effect on termite activity. Possible mechanisms that drive the seasonal and daily cycles in termite activity, as measured by AE technology, and the possible implications for inspections and post-treatment analysis are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus