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Development of Silafluofen-Based Termiticides in Japan and Thailand.

Katsuda Y, Minamite Y, Vongkaluang C - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Additional silafluofen product lines include anti-termitic plastic sheets which are laid under buildings.On the other hand, in Thailand, we proceeded with development works of silafluofen-based termiticides from 2005 by starting laboratory efficacy tests and field efficacy tests in Phuket.Both laboratory and field tests showed good efficacy as a soil termiticide, suggesting that the material will perform well for commercial use in high biological hazard environments such as Thailand and can be used in environments close to water where fish toxicity might be a concern with other pyrethroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dainihon Jochugiku Co., Ltd., 1-11, 1-Chome, Daikoku-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 561-0827, Japan. y.katsuda@kincho.co.jp.

ABSTRACT
With the advancement from natural pyrethrins to synthetic pyrethroids, their applications have expanded from household insecticides for indoor use against sanitary pests to outdoor use for agriculture, forestry, animal health, termite control, and many other pest situations. However, high fish toxicity and development of pyrethroid resistance in some pests have been cited as common shortcomings of pyrethroids. To overcome these pyrethroid problems such as high fish toxicity, Katsuda and fellow scientists invented silafluofen by introducing a silicone atom into the pyrethroidal chemical structure in 1984. In addition to the high insecticidal activity and low mammalian toxicity, this compound features low fish toxicity, chemical stability under sunlight, in the soil and under alkaline environments. These features make silafluofen unique among pyrethroids. In Japan, silafluofen has been used as an agricultural insecticide for 15 years since 1995 for various plants, especially useful for paddy rice protection because of its low fish toxicity. Over the last 20 years, silafluofen-based termiticides including emulsifiable concentrate (EC) and oil formulations have been widely used in Japan for soil treatment and timber treatments. Additional silafluofen product lines include anti-termitic plastic sheets which are laid under buildings. In this paper, literature on the development of silafluofen and its use in Japan are reviewed. On the other hand, in Thailand, we proceeded with development works of silafluofen-based termiticides from 2005 by starting laboratory efficacy tests and field efficacy tests in Phuket. Both laboratory and field tests showed good efficacy as a soil termiticide, suggesting that the material will perform well for commercial use in high biological hazard environments such as Thailand and can be used in environments close to water where fish toxicity might be a concern with other pyrethroids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: Dainihon Jochugiku and Hoechst in 1988 jointly started developing silafluofen for agricultural use in Japan. After silafluofen received registration as an agrochemical pesticide in 1995, its first agricultural uses included rice paddies, fruit trees, tea trees, and turf Its registration was especially useful in rice paddies because of its low toxicity to fish. Independently during the same period, Dainihon Jochugiku proceeded with the development of silafluofen's non-agricultural uses including termiticides. In Japan, the marketing of silafluofen-based termiticides (Table 1) started in 1991 when emulsifiable concentrates (EC) and oil formulations were applied for soil treatment and timber treatment respectively. Presently EC formulations for timber treatment are widely used. A more recent use (1998) and product line for silafluofen includes its use as anti-termitic plastic sheets impregnated with silafluofen and plastic resin. These sheets are installed under newly-built homes to prevent ingress of termites from the ground. Typical treatment scenes are illustrated in Figure 2. After 20 years, silafluofen continues to be a widely used and successful termiticide product with an excellent reputation in providing effective termite control.


Development of Silafluofen-Based Termiticides in Japan and Thailand.

Katsuda Y, Minamite Y, Vongkaluang C - Insects (2011)

Treatment scenes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553446&req=5

f2-insects-02-00532: Treatment scenes.
Mentions: Dainihon Jochugiku and Hoechst in 1988 jointly started developing silafluofen for agricultural use in Japan. After silafluofen received registration as an agrochemical pesticide in 1995, its first agricultural uses included rice paddies, fruit trees, tea trees, and turf Its registration was especially useful in rice paddies because of its low toxicity to fish. Independently during the same period, Dainihon Jochugiku proceeded with the development of silafluofen's non-agricultural uses including termiticides. In Japan, the marketing of silafluofen-based termiticides (Table 1) started in 1991 when emulsifiable concentrates (EC) and oil formulations were applied for soil treatment and timber treatment respectively. Presently EC formulations for timber treatment are widely used. A more recent use (1998) and product line for silafluofen includes its use as anti-termitic plastic sheets impregnated with silafluofen and plastic resin. These sheets are installed under newly-built homes to prevent ingress of termites from the ground. Typical treatment scenes are illustrated in Figure 2. After 20 years, silafluofen continues to be a widely used and successful termiticide product with an excellent reputation in providing effective termite control.

Bottom Line: Additional silafluofen product lines include anti-termitic plastic sheets which are laid under buildings.On the other hand, in Thailand, we proceeded with development works of silafluofen-based termiticides from 2005 by starting laboratory efficacy tests and field efficacy tests in Phuket.Both laboratory and field tests showed good efficacy as a soil termiticide, suggesting that the material will perform well for commercial use in high biological hazard environments such as Thailand and can be used in environments close to water where fish toxicity might be a concern with other pyrethroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dainihon Jochugiku Co., Ltd., 1-11, 1-Chome, Daikoku-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 561-0827, Japan. y.katsuda@kincho.co.jp.

ABSTRACT
With the advancement from natural pyrethrins to synthetic pyrethroids, their applications have expanded from household insecticides for indoor use against sanitary pests to outdoor use for agriculture, forestry, animal health, termite control, and many other pest situations. However, high fish toxicity and development of pyrethroid resistance in some pests have been cited as common shortcomings of pyrethroids. To overcome these pyrethroid problems such as high fish toxicity, Katsuda and fellow scientists invented silafluofen by introducing a silicone atom into the pyrethroidal chemical structure in 1984. In addition to the high insecticidal activity and low mammalian toxicity, this compound features low fish toxicity, chemical stability under sunlight, in the soil and under alkaline environments. These features make silafluofen unique among pyrethroids. In Japan, silafluofen has been used as an agricultural insecticide for 15 years since 1995 for various plants, especially useful for paddy rice protection because of its low fish toxicity. Over the last 20 years, silafluofen-based termiticides including emulsifiable concentrate (EC) and oil formulations have been widely used in Japan for soil treatment and timber treatments. Additional silafluofen product lines include anti-termitic plastic sheets which are laid under buildings. In this paper, literature on the development of silafluofen and its use in Japan are reviewed. On the other hand, in Thailand, we proceeded with development works of silafluofen-based termiticides from 2005 by starting laboratory efficacy tests and field efficacy tests in Phuket. Both laboratory and field tests showed good efficacy as a soil termiticide, suggesting that the material will perform well for commercial use in high biological hazard environments such as Thailand and can be used in environments close to water where fish toxicity might be a concern with other pyrethroids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus