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Preferences of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) among Three Commercial Wood Species.

Hapukotuwa NK, Grace JK - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: A multiple-choice (three-choice) assay was used for four weeks (28 days) in order to simulate field conditions of food choice and assess termite feeding preferences under 28 °C and 72-80% RH. 400 termites (360 workers: 40 soldiers) were released into each test jar.Termite mortality was recorded at the end of the test; and wood wafers were oven-dried and weighed before and after termite exposure to determine the mass loss due to termite feeding, and rated visually on a 0 (failure) to 10 (sound) scale.There were significant differences in mean mass loss values among the three wood species and between two termite species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, Gilmore Hall 310, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. nirmala@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, and the Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann), are both pests of wood in service in Hawaii and Florida. We conducted a laboratory study using method modified from those described in standard E1-09 of the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA 2009) to assess the termite resistance of three commercially available wood species used in regions of the USA where both termite species occur: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziessii, southern yellow pine, Pinus spp. and redwood, Sequoia sempervirens. A multiple-choice (three-choice) assay was used for four weeks (28 days) in order to simulate field conditions of food choice and assess termite feeding preferences under 28 °C and 72-80% RH. 400 termites (360 workers: 40 soldiers) were released into each test jar. Five replicates and two controls of each wood species were used with each termite species. Termite mortality was recorded at the end of the test; and wood wafers were oven-dried and weighed before and after termite exposure to determine the mass loss due to termite feeding, and rated visually on a 0 (failure) to 10 (sound) scale. There were significant differences in mean mass loss values among the three wood species and between two termite species. The mean mass loss value for redwood was significantly lower than Douglas fir and southern yellow pine with both termite species. However, C. formosanus showed increased feeding on Douglas fir and southern yellow pine compared to C. gestroi.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample test jar with three different wood species.
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f1-insects-02-00499: Sample test jar with three different wood species.

Mentions: The test containers consisted of 85 mm diameter by 97 mm tall polystyrene jars with a plastic screw top lid. Two sets of jars were used: test jars (with live termites) and control jars (without termites). Each jar contained 150 g of silica sand (fine granules of 40–100 mesh, Fisher Scientific, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 07410), 30 mL of distilled water, and one wood wafer from each of the three different wood species (three wafers in the same jar–Figure 1).


Preferences of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) among Three Commercial Wood Species.

Hapukotuwa NK, Grace JK - Insects (2011)

Sample test jar with three different wood species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553443&req=5

f1-insects-02-00499: Sample test jar with three different wood species.
Mentions: The test containers consisted of 85 mm diameter by 97 mm tall polystyrene jars with a plastic screw top lid. Two sets of jars were used: test jars (with live termites) and control jars (without termites). Each jar contained 150 g of silica sand (fine granules of 40–100 mesh, Fisher Scientific, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 07410), 30 mL of distilled water, and one wood wafer from each of the three different wood species (three wafers in the same jar–Figure 1).

Bottom Line: A multiple-choice (three-choice) assay was used for four weeks (28 days) in order to simulate field conditions of food choice and assess termite feeding preferences under 28 °C and 72-80% RH. 400 termites (360 workers: 40 soldiers) were released into each test jar.Termite mortality was recorded at the end of the test; and wood wafers were oven-dried and weighed before and after termite exposure to determine the mass loss due to termite feeding, and rated visually on a 0 (failure) to 10 (sound) scale.There were significant differences in mean mass loss values among the three wood species and between two termite species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, Gilmore Hall 310, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. nirmala@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, and the Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann), are both pests of wood in service in Hawaii and Florida. We conducted a laboratory study using method modified from those described in standard E1-09 of the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA 2009) to assess the termite resistance of three commercially available wood species used in regions of the USA where both termite species occur: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziessii, southern yellow pine, Pinus spp. and redwood, Sequoia sempervirens. A multiple-choice (three-choice) assay was used for four weeks (28 days) in order to simulate field conditions of food choice and assess termite feeding preferences under 28 °C and 72-80% RH. 400 termites (360 workers: 40 soldiers) were released into each test jar. Five replicates and two controls of each wood species were used with each termite species. Termite mortality was recorded at the end of the test; and wood wafers were oven-dried and weighed before and after termite exposure to determine the mass loss due to termite feeding, and rated visually on a 0 (failure) to 10 (sound) scale. There were significant differences in mean mass loss values among the three wood species and between two termite species. The mean mass loss value for redwood was significantly lower than Douglas fir and southern yellow pine with both termite species. However, C. formosanus showed increased feeding on Douglas fir and southern yellow pine compared to C. gestroi.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus