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Comparative Study of the Resistance of Six Hawaii-Grown Bamboo Species to Attack by the Subterranean Termites Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae).

Hapukotuwa NK, Grace JK - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Mean mass losses of the six species as a result of termite feeding ranged from 13-29%; with the two most resistant bamboo species, Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea and Bambusa oldhamii, demonstrating significantly greater resistance to termite attack than the most susceptible bamboo species, Guadua anguistifolia, with both termite species.Overall, we observed very little difference in wood preference between C. formosanus and C. gestroi.Although bamboo is a very promising construction material, and species clearly differ in their susceptibility to termite attack, all six species evaluated in the present study would require additional protection for use under conditions of high termite pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, Gilmore Hall 310, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. nirmala@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo is widely grown and utilized as a construction material around the world, particularly in the tropics. At present, there are about 70 bamboo species and varieties recorded from Hawaii. The objective of our study was to determine the relative resistance of six Hawaii-grown bamboo species to attack by Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann). Four-week laboratory feeding trials were performed as described in standard E1-09 of the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA 2009). Samples of each of the six bamboo species were individually exposed to 200 termites (with 10% soldiers); and termite mortality, wood mass loss, and visual appearance of the samples (on a scale of 0-10) were recorded at the conclusion of the trail. Mean mass losses of the six species as a result of termite feeding ranged from 13-29%; with the two most resistant bamboo species, Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea and Bambusa oldhamii, demonstrating significantly greater resistance to termite attack than the most susceptible bamboo species, Guadua anguistifolia, with both termite species. Dendrocalamus brandisii, Dendrocalamus latiflorus, and Bambusa hirose were intermediate in their termite resistance. Overall, we observed very little difference in wood preference between C. formosanus and C. gestroi. Although bamboo is a very promising construction material, and species clearly differ in their susceptibility to termite attack, all six species evaluated in the present study would require additional protection for use under conditions of high termite pressure.

No MeSH data available.


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Bamboo blocks showing damage from C. formosanus. Image courtesy of Robert Oshiro.
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f3-insects-02-00475: Bamboo blocks showing damage from C. formosanus. Image courtesy of Robert Oshiro.

Mentions: Termite attack on the six bamboo species after four weeks is depicted in Figures 3 and 4. Summaries of the results of our data analyses are presented in Tables 1 and 2. Mean visual ratings of termite damage ranged from moderate to severe with both termite species. Among the six species of bamboo tested, overall mass losses from both termite species ranged from 13%–29%. Maximum damage was observed on Guadua angustifolia (GA) for both termite species (C. formosanus 28.84%, C. gestroi 24.52%) and minimum damage was observed in Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea (GP) (C. formosanus 14.20%, C. gestroi 12.96%). The remaining bamboo species showed intermediate mass loss values. Damage on each bamboo species was similar from both termites When we compared termite feeding on these bamboo species to results obtained previously with three commercial woods (Douglas fir, southern yellow pine and redwood), C. formosanus showed greater feeding on Douglas fir (33.67 ± 7.85) and southern yellow pine (27.98 ± 10.63) than on the six bamboo species. However, with C. gestroi, feeding on bamboo was greater than that observed on to Douglas fir (13.39 ± 9.52) or southern yellow pine (13.85 ± 9.35). Both termite species fed least on redwood in comparison to either other commercial wood or bamboo (C. formosanus − 4.75 ± 2.73, C. gestroi − 6.28 ± 4.78).


Comparative Study of the Resistance of Six Hawaii-Grown Bamboo Species to Attack by the Subterranean Termites Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae).

Hapukotuwa NK, Grace JK - Insects (2011)

Bamboo blocks showing damage from C. formosanus. Image courtesy of Robert Oshiro.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553440&req=5

f3-insects-02-00475: Bamboo blocks showing damage from C. formosanus. Image courtesy of Robert Oshiro.
Mentions: Termite attack on the six bamboo species after four weeks is depicted in Figures 3 and 4. Summaries of the results of our data analyses are presented in Tables 1 and 2. Mean visual ratings of termite damage ranged from moderate to severe with both termite species. Among the six species of bamboo tested, overall mass losses from both termite species ranged from 13%–29%. Maximum damage was observed on Guadua angustifolia (GA) for both termite species (C. formosanus 28.84%, C. gestroi 24.52%) and minimum damage was observed in Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea (GP) (C. formosanus 14.20%, C. gestroi 12.96%). The remaining bamboo species showed intermediate mass loss values. Damage on each bamboo species was similar from both termites When we compared termite feeding on these bamboo species to results obtained previously with three commercial woods (Douglas fir, southern yellow pine and redwood), C. formosanus showed greater feeding on Douglas fir (33.67 ± 7.85) and southern yellow pine (27.98 ± 10.63) than on the six bamboo species. However, with C. gestroi, feeding on bamboo was greater than that observed on to Douglas fir (13.39 ± 9.52) or southern yellow pine (13.85 ± 9.35). Both termite species fed least on redwood in comparison to either other commercial wood or bamboo (C. formosanus − 4.75 ± 2.73, C. gestroi − 6.28 ± 4.78).

Bottom Line: Mean mass losses of the six species as a result of termite feeding ranged from 13-29%; with the two most resistant bamboo species, Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea and Bambusa oldhamii, demonstrating significantly greater resistance to termite attack than the most susceptible bamboo species, Guadua anguistifolia, with both termite species.Overall, we observed very little difference in wood preference between C. formosanus and C. gestroi.Although bamboo is a very promising construction material, and species clearly differ in their susceptibility to termite attack, all six species evaluated in the present study would require additional protection for use under conditions of high termite pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, Gilmore Hall 310, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. nirmala@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo is widely grown and utilized as a construction material around the world, particularly in the tropics. At present, there are about 70 bamboo species and varieties recorded from Hawaii. The objective of our study was to determine the relative resistance of six Hawaii-grown bamboo species to attack by Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann). Four-week laboratory feeding trials were performed as described in standard E1-09 of the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA 2009). Samples of each of the six bamboo species were individually exposed to 200 termites (with 10% soldiers); and termite mortality, wood mass loss, and visual appearance of the samples (on a scale of 0-10) were recorded at the conclusion of the trail. Mean mass losses of the six species as a result of termite feeding ranged from 13-29%; with the two most resistant bamboo species, Gigantocholoa pseudoarundinacea and Bambusa oldhamii, demonstrating significantly greater resistance to termite attack than the most susceptible bamboo species, Guadua anguistifolia, with both termite species. Dendrocalamus brandisii, Dendrocalamus latiflorus, and Bambusa hirose were intermediate in their termite resistance. Overall, we observed very little difference in wood preference between C. formosanus and C. gestroi. Although bamboo is a very promising construction material, and species clearly differ in their susceptibility to termite attack, all six species evaluated in the present study would require additional protection for use under conditions of high termite pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus