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Aquatic Insects in Eastern Australia: A Window on Ecology and Evolution of Dispersal in Streams.

Hughes JM, Huey JA, McLean AJ, Baggiano O - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species.In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera.We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Rivers Institute and Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia. jane.hughes@griffith.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Studies of connectivity of natural populations are often conducted at different timescales. Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species. In contrast, studies conducted at historical timescales are usually more focused on evolutionary or biogeographic questions. In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera. We conclude that: (1) For both groups, the major mechanism of dispersal is by adult flight, with larval drift playing a very minor role and with unusual patterns of genetic structure at fine scales explained by the "patchy recruitment hypothesis"; (2) There is some evidence presented to suggest that at slightly larger spatial scales (~100 km) caddisflies may be slightly more connected than mayflies; (3) Examinations of three species at historical timescales showed that, in southeast Queensland Australia, despite there being no significant glaciation during the Pleistocene, there are clear impacts of Pleistocene climate changes on their genetic structure; and (4) The use of mitochondrial DNA sequence data has uncovered a number of cryptic species complexes in both trichopterans and ephemeropterans. We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenies for two ephemeropteran taxa, Altophlebia spp. (top) and Bungona narilla (bottom), and the geographic distributions of cryptic species. The sampled region is identical to Figure 3.
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f4-insects-02-00447: Phylogenies for two ephemeropteran taxa, Altophlebia spp. (top) and Bungona narilla (bottom), and the geographic distributions of cryptic species. The sampled region is identical to Figure 3.

Mentions: In eastern Australian caddis and mayflies, we have also found evidence for cryptic species (Figure 4). In Cheumatopsyche, mtDNA COI indicated the possibility of multiple species in a sample from the Sydney area in New South Wales (NSW) [51]. We also identified Atalophlebia AV13A and D as being possible cryptic species from the mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Subsequent morphological analysis found some differences between species in both groups (John Dean personal communication). Further analysis of the two species of Atalophlebia showed that not only did they have rather different distributions, with one occurring from about sea-level to 200 m, whereas the other occurred only above 100 m, but also their genetic structure was very different, with one being essentially panmictic in the study area and the other highly structured between northern and southern regions. There were four species of Cheumatopsyche in the NSW study. One species, Cheumatopsyche AV1, was found in all 23 site sampled, while the other three species were only found in one, two or three sites [51]. Unfortunately, there is not always sufficient taxonomic expertise, so not all cases of cryptic species can be explored morphologically.


Aquatic Insects in Eastern Australia: A Window on Ecology and Evolution of Dispersal in Streams.

Hughes JM, Huey JA, McLean AJ, Baggiano O - Insects (2011)

Phylogenies for two ephemeropteran taxa, Altophlebia spp. (top) and Bungona narilla (bottom), and the geographic distributions of cryptic species. The sampled region is identical to Figure 3.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553437&req=5

f4-insects-02-00447: Phylogenies for two ephemeropteran taxa, Altophlebia spp. (top) and Bungona narilla (bottom), and the geographic distributions of cryptic species. The sampled region is identical to Figure 3.
Mentions: In eastern Australian caddis and mayflies, we have also found evidence for cryptic species (Figure 4). In Cheumatopsyche, mtDNA COI indicated the possibility of multiple species in a sample from the Sydney area in New South Wales (NSW) [51]. We also identified Atalophlebia AV13A and D as being possible cryptic species from the mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Subsequent morphological analysis found some differences between species in both groups (John Dean personal communication). Further analysis of the two species of Atalophlebia showed that not only did they have rather different distributions, with one occurring from about sea-level to 200 m, whereas the other occurred only above 100 m, but also their genetic structure was very different, with one being essentially panmictic in the study area and the other highly structured between northern and southern regions. There were four species of Cheumatopsyche in the NSW study. One species, Cheumatopsyche AV1, was found in all 23 site sampled, while the other three species were only found in one, two or three sites [51]. Unfortunately, there is not always sufficient taxonomic expertise, so not all cases of cryptic species can be explored morphologically.

Bottom Line: Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species.In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera.We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Rivers Institute and Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia. jane.hughes@griffith.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Studies of connectivity of natural populations are often conducted at different timescales. Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species. In contrast, studies conducted at historical timescales are usually more focused on evolutionary or biogeographic questions. In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera. We conclude that: (1) For both groups, the major mechanism of dispersal is by adult flight, with larval drift playing a very minor role and with unusual patterns of genetic structure at fine scales explained by the "patchy recruitment hypothesis"; (2) There is some evidence presented to suggest that at slightly larger spatial scales (~100 km) caddisflies may be slightly more connected than mayflies; (3) Examinations of three species at historical timescales showed that, in southeast Queensland Australia, despite there being no significant glaciation during the Pleistocene, there are clear impacts of Pleistocene climate changes on their genetic structure; and (4) The use of mitochondrial DNA sequence data has uncovered a number of cryptic species complexes in both trichopterans and ephemeropterans. We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus