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Aquatic Insects in Eastern Australia: A Window on Ecology and Evolution of Dispersal in Streams.

Hughes JM, Huey JA, McLean AJ, Baggiano O - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species.In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera.We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Rivers Institute and Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia. jane.hughes@griffith.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Studies of connectivity of natural populations are often conducted at different timescales. Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species. In contrast, studies conducted at historical timescales are usually more focused on evolutionary or biogeographic questions. In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera. We conclude that: (1) For both groups, the major mechanism of dispersal is by adult flight, with larval drift playing a very minor role and with unusual patterns of genetic structure at fine scales explained by the "patchy recruitment hypothesis"; (2) There is some evidence presented to suggest that at slightly larger spatial scales (~100 km) caddisflies may be slightly more connected than mayflies; (3) Examinations of three species at historical timescales showed that, in southeast Queensland Australia, despite there being no significant glaciation during the Pleistocene, there are clear impacts of Pleistocene climate changes on their genetic structure; and (4) The use of mitochondrial DNA sequence data has uncovered a number of cryptic species complexes in both trichopterans and ephemeropterans. We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot showing correlation between genetic distance and geographic scale of study for nine species of Ephemeroptera (red circles) and Trichoptera (blue triangles).
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f2-insects-02-00447: Scatter plot showing correlation between genetic distance and geographic scale of study for nine species of Ephemeroptera (red circles) and Trichoptera (blue triangles).

Mentions: In order to account for the different scale of studies included in the analysis, we then compared the residuals for caddisflies with those for mayflies. Values above the line would indicate poorer dispersal abilities than the average, while those below the line would suggest better dispersal abilities. Figure 2 shows that all, except one, mayflies are above the line. This one point (Atalophlebia AV13 D) [29] is unusual in that it is the only truly lowland species in the analysis (for both mayflies and caddisflies). Nonetheless, these results strongly suggest that mayflies are poorer dispersers than caddisflies, at least in upland species. More studies, especially from other regions would enable a full statistical analysis of this trend and confirmation of the result.


Aquatic Insects in Eastern Australia: A Window on Ecology and Evolution of Dispersal in Streams.

Hughes JM, Huey JA, McLean AJ, Baggiano O - Insects (2011)

Scatter plot showing correlation between genetic distance and geographic scale of study for nine species of Ephemeroptera (red circles) and Trichoptera (blue triangles).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553437&req=5

f2-insects-02-00447: Scatter plot showing correlation between genetic distance and geographic scale of study for nine species of Ephemeroptera (red circles) and Trichoptera (blue triangles).
Mentions: In order to account for the different scale of studies included in the analysis, we then compared the residuals for caddisflies with those for mayflies. Values above the line would indicate poorer dispersal abilities than the average, while those below the line would suggest better dispersal abilities. Figure 2 shows that all, except one, mayflies are above the line. This one point (Atalophlebia AV13 D) [29] is unusual in that it is the only truly lowland species in the analysis (for both mayflies and caddisflies). Nonetheless, these results strongly suggest that mayflies are poorer dispersers than caddisflies, at least in upland species. More studies, especially from other regions would enable a full statistical analysis of this trend and confirmation of the result.

Bottom Line: Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species.In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera.We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Rivers Institute and Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia. jane.hughes@griffith.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Studies of connectivity of natural populations are often conducted at different timescales. Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species. In contrast, studies conducted at historical timescales are usually more focused on evolutionary or biogeographic questions. In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera. We conclude that: (1) For both groups, the major mechanism of dispersal is by adult flight, with larval drift playing a very minor role and with unusual patterns of genetic structure at fine scales explained by the "patchy recruitment hypothesis"; (2) There is some evidence presented to suggest that at slightly larger spatial scales (~100 km) caddisflies may be slightly more connected than mayflies; (3) Examinations of three species at historical timescales showed that, in southeast Queensland Australia, despite there being no significant glaciation during the Pleistocene, there are clear impacts of Pleistocene climate changes on their genetic structure; and (4) The use of mitochondrial DNA sequence data has uncovered a number of cryptic species complexes in both trichopterans and ephemeropterans. We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus