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Dispersal of Rhagoletis cerasi in Commercial Cherry Orchards: Efficacy of Soil Covering Nets for Cherry Fruit Fly Control.

Daniel C, Baker B - Insects (2013)

Bottom Line: However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition.The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%.The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
Demand for organic cherries offers producers a premium price to improve their commercial viability. Organic standards require that producers find alternatives to pesticides. Soil treatments to control the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephrididae) appear to be an attractive option. However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition. To examine the general potential of soil treatments and to understand the dispersal and flight behaviour of R. cerasi within orchards, experiments using netting to cover the soil were conducted in two orchards with different pest pressure during two years. The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%. The data showed that the flies have a dispersal of less than 5 m within orchards, which is very low. The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of soil covering with netting on average number of R. cerasi (±se) on yellow sticky traps in orchard A (2005) and orchard B (2006). Statistical analysis: orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 34.99, p < 0.001; Orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 118.46, p < 0.001, variety: F4,9 = 4.70, p = 0.03; Tukey HSD-Test α = 0.05; different letters show significant differences.
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insects-04-00168-f003: Effects of soil covering with netting on average number of R. cerasi (±se) on yellow sticky traps in orchard A (2005) and orchard B (2006). Statistical analysis: orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 34.99, p < 0.001; Orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 118.46, p < 0.001, variety: F4,9 = 4.70, p = 0.03; Tukey HSD-Test α = 0.05; different letters show significant differences.

Mentions: Cumulative captures of flies per trap during the whole coverage period are given in Figure 3. The netting significantly reduced the number of flies and showed an efficacy of 76 to 77% using Abbott’s formula [21]. No significant differences were found between the border within 10 m of the control and the centre of the netting. Differences in numbers of flies per trap after removal of the netting were not significant (statistical analysis orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 2.49, p = 0.12; orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 0.73, p = 0.51, variety: F4,9 = 0.91, p = 0.50).


Dispersal of Rhagoletis cerasi in Commercial Cherry Orchards: Efficacy of Soil Covering Nets for Cherry Fruit Fly Control.

Daniel C, Baker B - Insects (2013)

Effects of soil covering with netting on average number of R. cerasi (±se) on yellow sticky traps in orchard A (2005) and orchard B (2006). Statistical analysis: orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 34.99, p < 0.001; Orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 118.46, p < 0.001, variety: F4,9 = 4.70, p = 0.03; Tukey HSD-Test α = 0.05; different letters show significant differences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553435&req=5

insects-04-00168-f003: Effects of soil covering with netting on average number of R. cerasi (±se) on yellow sticky traps in orchard A (2005) and orchard B (2006). Statistical analysis: orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 34.99, p < 0.001; Orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 118.46, p < 0.001, variety: F4,9 = 4.70, p = 0.03; Tukey HSD-Test α = 0.05; different letters show significant differences.
Mentions: Cumulative captures of flies per trap during the whole coverage period are given in Figure 3. The netting significantly reduced the number of flies and showed an efficacy of 76 to 77% using Abbott’s formula [21]. No significant differences were found between the border within 10 m of the control and the centre of the netting. Differences in numbers of flies per trap after removal of the netting were not significant (statistical analysis orchard A: one-way ANOVA: F2,12 = 2.49, p = 0.12; orchard B: two-way ANOVA [treatment, cherry variety]: treatment: F2,9 = 0.73, p = 0.51, variety: F4,9 = 0.91, p = 0.50).

Bottom Line: However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition.The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%.The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
Demand for organic cherries offers producers a premium price to improve their commercial viability. Organic standards require that producers find alternatives to pesticides. Soil treatments to control the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephrididae) appear to be an attractive option. However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition. To examine the general potential of soil treatments and to understand the dispersal and flight behaviour of R. cerasi within orchards, experiments using netting to cover the soil were conducted in two orchards with different pest pressure during two years. The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%. The data showed that the flies have a dispersal of less than 5 m within orchards, which is very low. The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus