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Dispersal of Rhagoletis cerasi in Commercial Cherry Orchards: Efficacy of Soil Covering Nets for Cherry Fruit Fly Control.

Daniel C, Baker B - Insects (2013)

Bottom Line: However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition.The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%.The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
Demand for organic cherries offers producers a premium price to improve their commercial viability. Organic standards require that producers find alternatives to pesticides. Soil treatments to control the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephrididae) appear to be an attractive option. However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition. To examine the general potential of soil treatments and to understand the dispersal and flight behaviour of R. cerasi within orchards, experiments using netting to cover the soil were conducted in two orchards with different pest pressure during two years. The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%. The data showed that the flies have a dispersal of less than 5 m within orchards, which is very low. The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flight activity of R. cerasi in orchard B in 2006.
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insects-04-00168-f002: Flight activity of R. cerasi in orchard B in 2006.

Mentions: Installation of soil covering nets: In the middle of each row, 40 (orchard B) to 50 (orchard A) running metres of the soil under the tree canopies were covered with a fine mesh netting (BiocontrolNet, Andermatt Biocontrol AG, Grossdietwil, Switzerland, white colour, 0.8 mm mesh width; 50 m long, 3 m wide) before the beginning of the emergence period. On each side of the rows, 12 (orchard B) and 25 running metres (orchard A) were left uncovered to provide an untreated control. The edges of the netting were buried to prevent flies from escaping. However, not all holes could be closed completely around the tree trunks. The soil under all other cherry trees in a perimeter of 50 m around the experimental orchards was covered in a similar manner. Dates of installation and removal of nettings are indicated in Figure 1, Figure 2.


Dispersal of Rhagoletis cerasi in Commercial Cherry Orchards: Efficacy of Soil Covering Nets for Cherry Fruit Fly Control.

Daniel C, Baker B - Insects (2013)

Flight activity of R. cerasi in orchard B in 2006.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553435&req=5

insects-04-00168-f002: Flight activity of R. cerasi in orchard B in 2006.
Mentions: Installation of soil covering nets: In the middle of each row, 40 (orchard B) to 50 (orchard A) running metres of the soil under the tree canopies were covered with a fine mesh netting (BiocontrolNet, Andermatt Biocontrol AG, Grossdietwil, Switzerland, white colour, 0.8 mm mesh width; 50 m long, 3 m wide) before the beginning of the emergence period. On each side of the rows, 12 (orchard B) and 25 running metres (orchard A) were left uncovered to provide an untreated control. The edges of the netting were buried to prevent flies from escaping. However, not all holes could be closed completely around the tree trunks. The soil under all other cherry trees in a perimeter of 50 m around the experimental orchards was covered in a similar manner. Dates of installation and removal of nettings are indicated in Figure 1, Figure 2.

Bottom Line: However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition.The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%.The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
Demand for organic cherries offers producers a premium price to improve their commercial viability. Organic standards require that producers find alternatives to pesticides. Soil treatments to control the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephrididae) appear to be an attractive option. However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition. To examine the general potential of soil treatments and to understand the dispersal and flight behaviour of R. cerasi within orchards, experiments using netting to cover the soil were conducted in two orchards with different pest pressure during two years. The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%. The data showed that the flies have a dispersal of less than 5 m within orchards, which is very low. The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus