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Persistence of the Gypsy Moth Pheromone, Disparlure, in the Environment in Various Climates.

Onufrieva KS, Thorpe KW, Hickman AD, Leonard DS, Roberts EA, Tobin PC - Insects (2013)

Bottom Line: The removal of Luretape® GM indicated that the strong persistent effect of disparlure in the environment reported by previous studies is produced by residual pheromone in the dispensers as opposed to environmental contamination.However, similar first- and second-year effects of pheromone treatments in VA and WI suggest that the release rate over one and two years was the same across markedly different climates.Future applications that use liquid or biodegradable formulations of synthetic pheromones could reduce the amount of persistence in the environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. ksenia@vt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Mating disruption techniques are used in pest control for many species of insects, yet little is known regarding the environmental persistence of these pheromones following their application and if persistence is affected by climatic conditions. We first studied the persistent effect of ground applications of Luretape® GM in Lymantria dispar (L) mating disruption in VA, USA in 2006. The removal of Luretape® GM indicated that the strong persistent effect of disparlure in the environment reported by previous studies is produced by residual pheromone in the dispensers as opposed to environmental contamination. In 2010 and 2011, we evaluated the efficacy of two formulations, Disrupt® II and SPLAT GM(TM), in VA and WI, USA, which presented different climatic conditions. In plots treated in WI and VA, male moth catches in pheromone-baited traps were reduced in the year of treatment and one year after the pheromone applications relative to untreated controls. However, similar first- and second-year effects of pheromone treatments in VA and WI suggest that the release rate over one and two years was the same across markedly different climates. Future applications that use liquid or biodegradable formulations of synthetic pheromones could reduce the amount of persistence in the environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of females fertilized (± SE) in plots treated with Luretape® GM (LT) in Goshen Wildlife Management Area, VA in 2006. Bars with the same letter are not significantly different.
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insects-04-00104-f003: Proportion of females fertilized (± SE) in plots treated with Luretape® GM (LT) in Goshen Wildlife Management Area, VA in 2006. Bars with the same letter are not significantly different.

Mentions: In the short-term exposure experiment, mating success of females was significantly reduced by treatments compared with mating success in the untreated control plots (G2 = 168; df = 63; P < 0.01). In the presence of Luretape® GM, female mating success was reduced to 4.8% of that in control plots, and individual females were estimated to be 292 times (95% CI = 53, >999) less likely to be mated when deployed in treated plots compared to control plots. The removal of Luretape® GM resulted in a gradual increase in mating success that ranged from 13% after 1 day to 69% after 4 days (Figure 3). One day after the removal of Luretape® GM, female mating success did not differ from plots where Luretape® GM was still present (G2 = 1.08; df=1, 21; P = 0.3); yet, females from plots where Luretape® GM had been removed for one day were still 100 times (95% CI = 18, 580) less likely to be mated than females from untreated control plots. Four days after Luretape® GM removal, females were 13 times (95% CI = 2, 94) more likely to be mated than in plots treated with Luretape® GM, but 8 times (95% CI = 3, 23) less likely to be mated than females in untreated control plots. In the long-term exposure experiment, in which treatment was applied in 2006 and data evaluated in 2007, both the mating success of females (G2 = 0.14; df = 35; P = 0.7) and male moth catch from pheromone-baited traps (F = 0.5; df= 1, 24; P = 0.6) were not significantly different between treated and untreated control plots.


Persistence of the Gypsy Moth Pheromone, Disparlure, in the Environment in Various Climates.

Onufrieva KS, Thorpe KW, Hickman AD, Leonard DS, Roberts EA, Tobin PC - Insects (2013)

Proportion of females fertilized (± SE) in plots treated with Luretape® GM (LT) in Goshen Wildlife Management Area, VA in 2006. Bars with the same letter are not significantly different.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553432&req=5

insects-04-00104-f003: Proportion of females fertilized (± SE) in plots treated with Luretape® GM (LT) in Goshen Wildlife Management Area, VA in 2006. Bars with the same letter are not significantly different.
Mentions: In the short-term exposure experiment, mating success of females was significantly reduced by treatments compared with mating success in the untreated control plots (G2 = 168; df = 63; P < 0.01). In the presence of Luretape® GM, female mating success was reduced to 4.8% of that in control plots, and individual females were estimated to be 292 times (95% CI = 53, >999) less likely to be mated when deployed in treated plots compared to control plots. The removal of Luretape® GM resulted in a gradual increase in mating success that ranged from 13% after 1 day to 69% after 4 days (Figure 3). One day after the removal of Luretape® GM, female mating success did not differ from plots where Luretape® GM was still present (G2 = 1.08; df=1, 21; P = 0.3); yet, females from plots where Luretape® GM had been removed for one day were still 100 times (95% CI = 18, 580) less likely to be mated than females from untreated control plots. Four days after Luretape® GM removal, females were 13 times (95% CI = 2, 94) more likely to be mated than in plots treated with Luretape® GM, but 8 times (95% CI = 3, 23) less likely to be mated than females in untreated control plots. In the long-term exposure experiment, in which treatment was applied in 2006 and data evaluated in 2007, both the mating success of females (G2 = 0.14; df = 35; P = 0.7) and male moth catch from pheromone-baited traps (F = 0.5; df= 1, 24; P = 0.6) were not significantly different between treated and untreated control plots.

Bottom Line: The removal of Luretape® GM indicated that the strong persistent effect of disparlure in the environment reported by previous studies is produced by residual pheromone in the dispensers as opposed to environmental contamination.However, similar first- and second-year effects of pheromone treatments in VA and WI suggest that the release rate over one and two years was the same across markedly different climates.Future applications that use liquid or biodegradable formulations of synthetic pheromones could reduce the amount of persistence in the environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. ksenia@vt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Mating disruption techniques are used in pest control for many species of insects, yet little is known regarding the environmental persistence of these pheromones following their application and if persistence is affected by climatic conditions. We first studied the persistent effect of ground applications of Luretape® GM in Lymantria dispar (L) mating disruption in VA, USA in 2006. The removal of Luretape® GM indicated that the strong persistent effect of disparlure in the environment reported by previous studies is produced by residual pheromone in the dispensers as opposed to environmental contamination. In 2010 and 2011, we evaluated the efficacy of two formulations, Disrupt® II and SPLAT GM(TM), in VA and WI, USA, which presented different climatic conditions. In plots treated in WI and VA, male moth catches in pheromone-baited traps were reduced in the year of treatment and one year after the pheromone applications relative to untreated controls. However, similar first- and second-year effects of pheromone treatments in VA and WI suggest that the release rate over one and two years was the same across markedly different climates. Future applications that use liquid or biodegradable formulations of synthetic pheromones could reduce the amount of persistence in the environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus