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Chemical Ecology of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and Potential for Alternative Control Methods.

Sablon L, Dickens JC, Haubruge É, Verheggen FJ - Insects (2012)

Bottom Line: In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones.Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section.The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unité d'Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Université de Liège, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium. ludovic.sablon@doct.ulg.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a major insect pest to potato farming for over 150 years and various control methods have been established to reduce its impact on potato fields. Crop rotation and pesticide use are currently the most widely used approaches, although alternative methods are being developed. Here we review the role of various volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in behavior changes of CPB that may have potential for their control. First, we describe all volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in host plant localization and acceptance by CPB beetles, including glycoalcaloids and host plant volatiles used as kairomones. In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones. Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section. The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Male-produced aggregation pheromone for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata: (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol or (S)-CPB I.
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insects-04-00031-f004: Male-produced aggregation pheromone for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata: (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol or (S)-CPB I.

Mentions: While several studies were directed to the characterization of a potential female-produced sex pheromone (see above), Dickens et al. [83] announced the discovery of an aggregation pheromone produced by males. Using GC-EAD (gas chromatography coupled with an electroantennographic detector) for analysis of aeration extracts of CPB males, active components were identified which elicited responses from olfactory receptors of both males and females. Among these chemicals, a single molecule was only found in volatiles of plants being fed on by male beetles. As only small quantities of the unknown compound were released, it was reasoned that males must regulate release through a feedback loop involving olfactory receptors on the antennae. When the antennae were excised, quantities of the unknown compound increased 40-fold. Topical application of juvenile hormone III (JH III) also stimulated pheromone release to a lesser extent. However, the combination of antennectomy and JH III treatment allowed a 200-fold increase, thus facilitating identification of the compound as (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol, named (S)-CPB I (Figure 4) [83]. The biological effect of (S)-CPB I was first evaluated in a Y-olfactometer on male and female CPB, both of which were highly attracted. The (R) enantiomer and the racemic mixture were not attractive [83]. CPB larvae also seem capable of perceiving the aggregation pheromone produced by adults, but further studies are needed to characterize larval behavior [76]. This aggregation pheromone should be useful in IPM programs as a key component of a potential attracticide (see later).


Chemical Ecology of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and Potential for Alternative Control Methods.

Sablon L, Dickens JC, Haubruge É, Verheggen FJ - Insects (2012)

Male-produced aggregation pheromone for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata: (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol or (S)-CPB I.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553428&req=5

insects-04-00031-f004: Male-produced aggregation pheromone for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata: (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol or (S)-CPB I.
Mentions: While several studies were directed to the characterization of a potential female-produced sex pheromone (see above), Dickens et al. [83] announced the discovery of an aggregation pheromone produced by males. Using GC-EAD (gas chromatography coupled with an electroantennographic detector) for analysis of aeration extracts of CPB males, active components were identified which elicited responses from olfactory receptors of both males and females. Among these chemicals, a single molecule was only found in volatiles of plants being fed on by male beetles. As only small quantities of the unknown compound were released, it was reasoned that males must regulate release through a feedback loop involving olfactory receptors on the antennae. When the antennae were excised, quantities of the unknown compound increased 40-fold. Topical application of juvenile hormone III (JH III) also stimulated pheromone release to a lesser extent. However, the combination of antennectomy and JH III treatment allowed a 200-fold increase, thus facilitating identification of the compound as (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol, named (S)-CPB I (Figure 4) [83]. The biological effect of (S)-CPB I was first evaluated in a Y-olfactometer on male and female CPB, both of which were highly attracted. The (R) enantiomer and the racemic mixture were not attractive [83]. CPB larvae also seem capable of perceiving the aggregation pheromone produced by adults, but further studies are needed to characterize larval behavior [76]. This aggregation pheromone should be useful in IPM programs as a key component of a potential attracticide (see later).

Bottom Line: In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones.Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section.The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unité d'Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Université de Liège, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium. ludovic.sablon@doct.ulg.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a major insect pest to potato farming for over 150 years and various control methods have been established to reduce its impact on potato fields. Crop rotation and pesticide use are currently the most widely used approaches, although alternative methods are being developed. Here we review the role of various volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in behavior changes of CPB that may have potential for their control. First, we describe all volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in host plant localization and acceptance by CPB beetles, including glycoalcaloids and host plant volatiles used as kairomones. In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones. Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section. The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus