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Chemical Ecology of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and Potential for Alternative Control Methods.

Sablon L, Dickens JC, Haubruge É, Verheggen FJ - Insects (2012)

Bottom Line: In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones.Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section.The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unité d'Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Université de Liège, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium. ludovic.sablon@doct.ulg.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a major insect pest to potato farming for over 150 years and various control methods have been established to reduce its impact on potato fields. Crop rotation and pesticide use are currently the most widely used approaches, although alternative methods are being developed. Here we review the role of various volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in behavior changes of CPB that may have potential for their control. First, we describe all volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in host plant localization and acceptance by CPB beetles, including glycoalcaloids and host plant volatiles used as kairomones. In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones. Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section. The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Potential deterrents for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, include glycoalkaloids and a derived aglycone. Abbreviations for sugar group: Rha: Rhamnose; Gal: Galactose; Glu: Glucose; Xyl: Xylose.
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insects-04-00031-f002: Potential deterrents for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, include glycoalkaloids and a derived aglycone. Abbreviations for sugar group: Rha: Rhamnose; Gal: Galactose; Glu: Glucose; Xyl: Xylose.

Mentions: Potatoes and other solanaceous plants contain glycoalkaloids [37,38] (Figure 2) that are thought to provide resistance against herbivorous insects including CPB [39]. Solanine, chaconine, tomatine [40], leptines [41] and demissines [42] have been identified as deterrents. Hybridization was used to create new potato progenies containing leptines with increased resistance to beetles [43]. Hollister et al. [44] demonstrated a specific dose dependent response to leptine I from a neuron associated with chemosensory hairs on the galea of CPB. Solanine and tomatine did not induce dose dependent responses but modified responses to leptine I and elicited irregular bursts of neural activity. These results are consistent with those of others and provide neural mechanisms for feeding deterrence attributed to these alkaloids [44,45,46].


Chemical Ecology of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and Potential for Alternative Control Methods.

Sablon L, Dickens JC, Haubruge É, Verheggen FJ - Insects (2012)

Potential deterrents for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, include glycoalkaloids and a derived aglycone. Abbreviations for sugar group: Rha: Rhamnose; Gal: Galactose; Glu: Glucose; Xyl: Xylose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553428&req=5

insects-04-00031-f002: Potential deterrents for Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, include glycoalkaloids and a derived aglycone. Abbreviations for sugar group: Rha: Rhamnose; Gal: Galactose; Glu: Glucose; Xyl: Xylose.
Mentions: Potatoes and other solanaceous plants contain glycoalkaloids [37,38] (Figure 2) that are thought to provide resistance against herbivorous insects including CPB [39]. Solanine, chaconine, tomatine [40], leptines [41] and demissines [42] have been identified as deterrents. Hybridization was used to create new potato progenies containing leptines with increased resistance to beetles [43]. Hollister et al. [44] demonstrated a specific dose dependent response to leptine I from a neuron associated with chemosensory hairs on the galea of CPB. Solanine and tomatine did not induce dose dependent responses but modified responses to leptine I and elicited irregular bursts of neural activity. These results are consistent with those of others and provide neural mechanisms for feeding deterrence attributed to these alkaloids [44,45,46].

Bottom Line: In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones.Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section.The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unité d'Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Université de Liège, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium. ludovic.sablon@doct.ulg.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a major insect pest to potato farming for over 150 years and various control methods have been established to reduce its impact on potato fields. Crop rotation and pesticide use are currently the most widely used approaches, although alternative methods are being developed. Here we review the role of various volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in behavior changes of CPB that may have potential for their control. First, we describe all volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in host plant localization and acceptance by CPB beetles, including glycoalcaloids and host plant volatiles used as kairomones. In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones. Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section. The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus