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Effects of Flight on Gene Expression and Aging in the Honey Bee Brain and Flight Muscle.

Margotta JW, Mancinelli GE, Benito AA, Ammons A, Roberts SP, Elekonich MM - Insects (2012)

Bottom Line: To investigate the effects of flight, behavioral state and age on gene expression, we used whole-genome microarrays and real-time PCR.Our data suggest that the transition from behaviors requiring little to no flight (nursing) to those requiring prolonged flight bouts (foraging), rather than the amount of previous flight per se, has a major effect on gene expression.Combined with our real-time PCR data, these data suggest an epigenetic control and energy balance role in honey bee functional senescence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA. margotta@unlv.nevada.edu.

ABSTRACT
Honey bees move through a series of in-hive tasks (e.g., "nursing") to outside tasks (e.g., "foraging") that are coincident with physiological changes and higher levels of metabolic activity. Social context can cause worker bees to speed up or slow down this process, and foragers may revert back to their earlier in-hive tasks accompanied by reversion to earlier physiological states. To investigate the effects of flight, behavioral state and age on gene expression, we used whole-genome microarrays and real-time PCR. Brain tissue and flight muscle exhibited different patterns of expression during behavioral transitions, with expression patterns in the brain reflecting both age and behavior, and expression patterns in flight muscle being primarily determined by age. Our data suggest that the transition from behaviors requiring little to no flight (nursing) to those requiring prolonged flight bouts (foraging), rather than the amount of previous flight per se, has a major effect on gene expression. Following behavioral reversion there was a partial reversion in gene expression but some aspects of forager expression patterns, such as those for genes involved in immune function, remained. Combined with our real-time PCR data, these data suggest an epigenetic control and energy balance role in honey bee functional senescence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression of immune transcripts in A. mellifera flight muscle. Quantification ofmRNA levels of bee specific immune transcripts (A, C), transcripts involved in immune signaling pathways (B, E), and innate immune response transcripts (D, F) revealed differential expression between ages and behaviors. Fold change represents the relative difference compared to one day old bees.
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insects-04-00009-f006: Expression of immune transcripts in A. mellifera flight muscle. Quantification ofmRNA levels of bee specific immune transcripts (A, C), transcripts involved in immune signaling pathways (B, E), and innate immune response transcripts (D, F) revealed differential expression between ages and behaviors. Fold change represents the relative difference compared to one day old bees.

Mentions: We determined whether different amounts of flight and behavioral reversion have an effect on the expression of a subset of these immunity transcripts identified as differentially expressed in our flight muscle microarray data (Figure 6). We measured mRNA levels in 2 bee-specific immunity transcripts: apidaecin (apid1) and abaecin (LOC406144), 2 immune signaling pathway transcripts: Toll-like receptor (tlr1) and hopscotch (hop), which is part of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and 2 transcripts involved in insect innate immunity: lysozyme (lys1) and polyphenoloxidase (ppo) using qRT-PCR. If the loss of immune function were primarily due to age, one would expect to see decreased expression of all of these immune function genes with aging in nurses as well as foragers.


Effects of Flight on Gene Expression and Aging in the Honey Bee Brain and Flight Muscle.

Margotta JW, Mancinelli GE, Benito AA, Ammons A, Roberts SP, Elekonich MM - Insects (2012)

Expression of immune transcripts in A. mellifera flight muscle. Quantification ofmRNA levels of bee specific immune transcripts (A, C), transcripts involved in immune signaling pathways (B, E), and innate immune response transcripts (D, F) revealed differential expression between ages and behaviors. Fold change represents the relative difference compared to one day old bees.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553427&req=5

insects-04-00009-f006: Expression of immune transcripts in A. mellifera flight muscle. Quantification ofmRNA levels of bee specific immune transcripts (A, C), transcripts involved in immune signaling pathways (B, E), and innate immune response transcripts (D, F) revealed differential expression between ages and behaviors. Fold change represents the relative difference compared to one day old bees.
Mentions: We determined whether different amounts of flight and behavioral reversion have an effect on the expression of a subset of these immunity transcripts identified as differentially expressed in our flight muscle microarray data (Figure 6). We measured mRNA levels in 2 bee-specific immunity transcripts: apidaecin (apid1) and abaecin (LOC406144), 2 immune signaling pathway transcripts: Toll-like receptor (tlr1) and hopscotch (hop), which is part of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and 2 transcripts involved in insect innate immunity: lysozyme (lys1) and polyphenoloxidase (ppo) using qRT-PCR. If the loss of immune function were primarily due to age, one would expect to see decreased expression of all of these immune function genes with aging in nurses as well as foragers.

Bottom Line: To investigate the effects of flight, behavioral state and age on gene expression, we used whole-genome microarrays and real-time PCR.Our data suggest that the transition from behaviors requiring little to no flight (nursing) to those requiring prolonged flight bouts (foraging), rather than the amount of previous flight per se, has a major effect on gene expression.Combined with our real-time PCR data, these data suggest an epigenetic control and energy balance role in honey bee functional senescence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA. margotta@unlv.nevada.edu.

ABSTRACT
Honey bees move through a series of in-hive tasks (e.g., "nursing") to outside tasks (e.g., "foraging") that are coincident with physiological changes and higher levels of metabolic activity. Social context can cause worker bees to speed up or slow down this process, and foragers may revert back to their earlier in-hive tasks accompanied by reversion to earlier physiological states. To investigate the effects of flight, behavioral state and age on gene expression, we used whole-genome microarrays and real-time PCR. Brain tissue and flight muscle exhibited different patterns of expression during behavioral transitions, with expression patterns in the brain reflecting both age and behavior, and expression patterns in flight muscle being primarily determined by age. Our data suggest that the transition from behaviors requiring little to no flight (nursing) to those requiring prolonged flight bouts (foraging), rather than the amount of previous flight per se, has a major effect on gene expression. Following behavioral reversion there was a partial reversion in gene expression but some aspects of forager expression patterns, such as those for genes involved in immune function, remained. Combined with our real-time PCR data, these data suggest an epigenetic control and energy balance role in honey bee functional senescence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus