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Host-Seeking Behavior in the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

Suchy JT, Lewis VR - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process.This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system.The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. jsuchy@berkeley.edu.

ABSTRACT
The reemergence of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, has recently spawned a frenzy of public, media, and academic attention. In response to the growing rate of infestation, considerable work has been focused on identifying the various host cues utilized by the bed bug in search of a meal. Most of these behavioral studies examine movement within a confined environment, such as a Petri dish. This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process. This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system. With the use of human breath as an attractant, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed how bed bugs navigate their environment between its harborage and the host. Levels of behavioral activity varied dramatically between bed bugs in the presence and absence of host odor. Bed bugs demonstrated not simply activation, but attraction to the chemical components of breath. Localized, stop-start host-seeking behavior or alternating periods of movement and pause were observed among bed bugs placed in the environment void of human breath, while those exposed to human breath demonstrated long range, stop-start host-seeking behavior. A more comprehensive understanding of bed bug host-seeking can lead to the development of traps and monitors that account for unique subtleties in their behavior. The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The time-lapse photography system and other equipment used to track the behavioral movement of the bed bugs throughout the experimental arena.
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f1-insects-02-00022: The time-lapse photography system and other equipment used to track the behavioral movement of the bed bugs throughout the experimental arena.

Mentions: A custom-made, white, acrylic tray (Nisei Plastics, Oakland, CA) was used as the experimental arena (Figure 1). The arena had a square base (91.44 × 91.44 cm) and short sides (5.08 cm). The sides of the arena were layered with Insect-A-Slip (BioQuip Products, Rancho Dominguez, CA), to prevent the bed bugs from escaping. The bottom of the arena was covered with a sheet of butcher paper (90.17 × 90.17 cm). White masking tape was used to hold down the butcher paper and keep the bugs from crawling underneath. The center of the arena was measured and marked lightly with pencil on the butcher paper. After each replicate, the used butcher paper was discarded and the arena was wiped down with 70% ethanol, before being reused.


Host-Seeking Behavior in the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

Suchy JT, Lewis VR - Insects (2011)

The time-lapse photography system and other equipment used to track the behavioral movement of the bed bugs throughout the experimental arena.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553421&req=5

f1-insects-02-00022: The time-lapse photography system and other equipment used to track the behavioral movement of the bed bugs throughout the experimental arena.
Mentions: A custom-made, white, acrylic tray (Nisei Plastics, Oakland, CA) was used as the experimental arena (Figure 1). The arena had a square base (91.44 × 91.44 cm) and short sides (5.08 cm). The sides of the arena were layered with Insect-A-Slip (BioQuip Products, Rancho Dominguez, CA), to prevent the bed bugs from escaping. The bottom of the arena was covered with a sheet of butcher paper (90.17 × 90.17 cm). White masking tape was used to hold down the butcher paper and keep the bugs from crawling underneath. The center of the arena was measured and marked lightly with pencil on the butcher paper. After each replicate, the used butcher paper was discarded and the arena was wiped down with 70% ethanol, before being reused.

Bottom Line: This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process.This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system.The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. jsuchy@berkeley.edu.

ABSTRACT
The reemergence of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, has recently spawned a frenzy of public, media, and academic attention. In response to the growing rate of infestation, considerable work has been focused on identifying the various host cues utilized by the bed bug in search of a meal. Most of these behavioral studies examine movement within a confined environment, such as a Petri dish. This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process. This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system. With the use of human breath as an attractant, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed how bed bugs navigate their environment between its harborage and the host. Levels of behavioral activity varied dramatically between bed bugs in the presence and absence of host odor. Bed bugs demonstrated not simply activation, but attraction to the chemical components of breath. Localized, stop-start host-seeking behavior or alternating periods of movement and pause were observed among bed bugs placed in the environment void of human breath, while those exposed to human breath demonstrated long range, stop-start host-seeking behavior. A more comprehensive understanding of bed bug host-seeking can lead to the development of traps and monitors that account for unique subtleties in their behavior. The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus