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A New Method for in Situ Measurement of Bt-Maize Pollen Deposition on Host-Plant Leaves.

Hofmann F, Otto M, Kuhn U, Ober S, Schlechtriemen U, Vögel R - Insects (2011)

Bottom Line: These methods often lack precision and they do not include the necessary information such as the spatial and temporal variation of pollen deposition on the leaves.The method is based on the use of a mobile digital microscope (Dino-Lite Pro, including DinoCapture software), which can be used in combination with a notebook in the field.Maize pollen could be correctly identified and pollen deposition as well as the spatial heterogeneity of maize pollen deposition was recorded on maize and different lepidopteran host plants (Centaurea scabiosa, Chenopodium album, Rumex spp., Succina pratensis and Urtica dioica) growing adjacent to maize fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TIEM Integrated Environmental Monitoring GbR, Nörten-Hardenberg/Bremen, Germany. f.hofmann@oekologiebuero.de.

ABSTRACT
Maize is wind pollinated and produces huge amounts of pollen. In consequence, the Cry toxins expressed in the pollen of Bt maize will be dispersed by wind in the surrounding vegetation leading to exposure of non-target organisms (NTO). NTO like lepidopteran larvae may be affected by the uptake of Bt-pollen deposited on their host plants. Although some information is available to estimate pollen deposition on host plants, recorded data are based on indirect measurements such as shaking or washing off pollen, or removing pollen with adhesive tapes. These methods often lack precision and they do not include the necessary information such as the spatial and temporal variation of pollen deposition on the leaves. Here, we present a new method for recording in situ the amount and the distribution of Bt-maize pollen deposited on host plant leaves. The method is based on the use of a mobile digital microscope (Dino-Lite Pro, including DinoCapture software), which can be used in combination with a notebook in the field. The method was evaluated during experiments in 2008 to 2010. Maize pollen could be correctly identified and pollen deposition as well as the spatial heterogeneity of maize pollen deposition was recorded on maize and different lepidopteran host plants (Centaurea scabiosa, Chenopodium album, Rumex spp., Succina pratensis and Urtica dioica) growing adjacent to maize fields.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Use of the digital microscope for in situ measurement of maize pollen in the field. The microscope is powered via the USB hub, the labtop monitor serves to verify the images taken.
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f1-insects-02-00012: Use of the digital microscope for in situ measurement of maize pollen in the field. The microscope is powered via the USB hub, the labtop monitor serves to verify the images taken.

Mentions: Digital imaging, including microscopy, has made tremendous advances during the last decade and digital microscopes have been used in medicine and in industrial inspection and quality control for many years. In our experiments, we used a digital microscope with a resolution of 1.3 megapixels (Dino-Lite Pro AM413MT; AnMo Electronics Corporation). The portable microscope is easy to handle with a total length of 10 cm and can be powered via the USB hub of a notebook. Figure 1 depicts the use of the USB powered microscope in the field. The microscope model used has a fixed focus, build in LED-lights and a magnification which can be adjusted from 10–70× and 200×. A measurement and calibration software (DinoCapture) is included by the manufacturer.


A New Method for in Situ Measurement of Bt-Maize Pollen Deposition on Host-Plant Leaves.

Hofmann F, Otto M, Kuhn U, Ober S, Schlechtriemen U, Vögel R - Insects (2011)

Use of the digital microscope for in situ measurement of maize pollen in the field. The microscope is powered via the USB hub, the labtop monitor serves to verify the images taken.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553420&req=5

f1-insects-02-00012: Use of the digital microscope for in situ measurement of maize pollen in the field. The microscope is powered via the USB hub, the labtop monitor serves to verify the images taken.
Mentions: Digital imaging, including microscopy, has made tremendous advances during the last decade and digital microscopes have been used in medicine and in industrial inspection and quality control for many years. In our experiments, we used a digital microscope with a resolution of 1.3 megapixels (Dino-Lite Pro AM413MT; AnMo Electronics Corporation). The portable microscope is easy to handle with a total length of 10 cm and can be powered via the USB hub of a notebook. Figure 1 depicts the use of the USB powered microscope in the field. The microscope model used has a fixed focus, build in LED-lights and a magnification which can be adjusted from 10–70× and 200×. A measurement and calibration software (DinoCapture) is included by the manufacturer.

Bottom Line: These methods often lack precision and they do not include the necessary information such as the spatial and temporal variation of pollen deposition on the leaves.The method is based on the use of a mobile digital microscope (Dino-Lite Pro, including DinoCapture software), which can be used in combination with a notebook in the field.Maize pollen could be correctly identified and pollen deposition as well as the spatial heterogeneity of maize pollen deposition was recorded on maize and different lepidopteran host plants (Centaurea scabiosa, Chenopodium album, Rumex spp., Succina pratensis and Urtica dioica) growing adjacent to maize fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TIEM Integrated Environmental Monitoring GbR, Nörten-Hardenberg/Bremen, Germany. f.hofmann@oekologiebuero.de.

ABSTRACT
Maize is wind pollinated and produces huge amounts of pollen. In consequence, the Cry toxins expressed in the pollen of Bt maize will be dispersed by wind in the surrounding vegetation leading to exposure of non-target organisms (NTO). NTO like lepidopteran larvae may be affected by the uptake of Bt-pollen deposited on their host plants. Although some information is available to estimate pollen deposition on host plants, recorded data are based on indirect measurements such as shaking or washing off pollen, or removing pollen with adhesive tapes. These methods often lack precision and they do not include the necessary information such as the spatial and temporal variation of pollen deposition on the leaves. Here, we present a new method for recording in situ the amount and the distribution of Bt-maize pollen deposited on host plant leaves. The method is based on the use of a mobile digital microscope (Dino-Lite Pro, including DinoCapture software), which can be used in combination with a notebook in the field. The method was evaluated during experiments in 2008 to 2010. Maize pollen could be correctly identified and pollen deposition as well as the spatial heterogeneity of maize pollen deposition was recorded on maize and different lepidopteran host plants (Centaurea scabiosa, Chenopodium album, Rumex spp., Succina pratensis and Urtica dioica) growing adjacent to maize fields.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus