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Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant.

Ren G, Zhang H, Lin X, Zhu J, Jia Z - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments.Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage.These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China ; Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions [low nitrogen fertilization (LN) and high nitrogen fertilization (HN)]. The results revealed that the leaf endophytic bacterial community was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria-affiliated families, such as Enterobacteriaceae and Xanthomonadaceae, which represent 28.7-86.8% and 2.14-42.6% of the total sequence reads, respectively, at all tested growth stages. The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments. The eCO2 effect on the bacterial communities differed greatly under different nitrogen application conditions and at different growth stages. Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage. These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

No MeSH data available.


Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of microbial communities from all samples (A) or those samples collected at the tillering (B), filling (C), and maturity (D) stages, respectively. The percentage in parentheses denotes the proportion of variation explained by each ordination axis. All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
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Figure 3: Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of microbial communities from all samples (A) or those samples collected at the tillering (B), filling (C), and maturity (D) stages, respectively. The percentage in parentheses denotes the proportion of variation explained by each ordination axis. All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.

Mentions: To examine the shift of the leaf endophytic bacterial community structures in response to eCO2 under different N fertilization levels at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages, a PCoA was performed based on the 454 pyrosequencing data (Figure 3). First, to understand how all of the samples were related to each other, a global PCoA was performed on the same ordination plot (Figure 3A). The results revealed that the axis separated the samples based on the growth stage, and the difference in bacterial communities from different treatment (CO2 and N treatments) was less than the difference between the different growth stages. Three non-parametric multivariate analyses (adonis, ANOSIM, and MRPP) also illustrated significant differences (P < 0.05) between the growth stages in the bacterial community structure (Table 1), whereas the significant difference was not always observed when the CO2 and N effects was tested by the three non-parametric multivariate analyses (Table 1). To further understand how bacterial communities from the same growth stage related to one another, the PCoA of the bacterial communities derived from the tillering, filling, and maturity stages were processed on three individual ordination plots (Figures 3B–D). The results showed that the magnitude of the eCO2 effect on the bacterial community structure varied greatly under different N fertilization levels and at different growth stages. The eCO2 showed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage. Specifically, at the tillering stage, the samples from aCO2 and eCO2 samples were distributed in different parts of the PCoA data space under both LN and HN levels, and adonis, ANOSIM, and MRPP further showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between bacterial communities at aCO2 and eCO2 (Table 1). However, a significant effect of eCO2 on the bacterial community structure was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage (Table 1). The PCoA result also revealed that the aCO2 and eCO2 samples under the HN level were distributed distantly in the data space at the filling stage, whereas those samples from aCO2 and eCO2 under the LN condition clustered closely (Figure 3C). At the maturity stage, no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure under both LN and HN fertilization levels were observed (Table 1), although most of aCO2 and eCO2 samples were distributed in a different data space (Figure 3D).


Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant.

Ren G, Zhang H, Lin X, Zhu J, Jia Z - Front Microbiol (2015)

Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of microbial communities from all samples (A) or those samples collected at the tillering (B), filling (C), and maturity (D) stages, respectively. The percentage in parentheses denotes the proportion of variation explained by each ordination axis. All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553393&req=5

Figure 3: Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of microbial communities from all samples (A) or those samples collected at the tillering (B), filling (C), and maturity (D) stages, respectively. The percentage in parentheses denotes the proportion of variation explained by each ordination axis. All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
Mentions: To examine the shift of the leaf endophytic bacterial community structures in response to eCO2 under different N fertilization levels at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages, a PCoA was performed based on the 454 pyrosequencing data (Figure 3). First, to understand how all of the samples were related to each other, a global PCoA was performed on the same ordination plot (Figure 3A). The results revealed that the axis separated the samples based on the growth stage, and the difference in bacterial communities from different treatment (CO2 and N treatments) was less than the difference between the different growth stages. Three non-parametric multivariate analyses (adonis, ANOSIM, and MRPP) also illustrated significant differences (P < 0.05) between the growth stages in the bacterial community structure (Table 1), whereas the significant difference was not always observed when the CO2 and N effects was tested by the three non-parametric multivariate analyses (Table 1). To further understand how bacterial communities from the same growth stage related to one another, the PCoA of the bacterial communities derived from the tillering, filling, and maturity stages were processed on three individual ordination plots (Figures 3B–D). The results showed that the magnitude of the eCO2 effect on the bacterial community structure varied greatly under different N fertilization levels and at different growth stages. The eCO2 showed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage. Specifically, at the tillering stage, the samples from aCO2 and eCO2 samples were distributed in different parts of the PCoA data space under both LN and HN levels, and adonis, ANOSIM, and MRPP further showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between bacterial communities at aCO2 and eCO2 (Table 1). However, a significant effect of eCO2 on the bacterial community structure was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage (Table 1). The PCoA result also revealed that the aCO2 and eCO2 samples under the HN level were distributed distantly in the data space at the filling stage, whereas those samples from aCO2 and eCO2 under the LN condition clustered closely (Figure 3C). At the maturity stage, no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure under both LN and HN fertilization levels were observed (Table 1), although most of aCO2 and eCO2 samples were distributed in a different data space (Figure 3D).

Bottom Line: The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments.Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage.These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China ; Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions [low nitrogen fertilization (LN) and high nitrogen fertilization (HN)]. The results revealed that the leaf endophytic bacterial community was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria-affiliated families, such as Enterobacteriaceae and Xanthomonadaceae, which represent 28.7-86.8% and 2.14-42.6% of the total sequence reads, respectively, at all tested growth stages. The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments. The eCO2 effect on the bacterial communities differed greatly under different nitrogen application conditions and at different growth stages. Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage. These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

No MeSH data available.