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Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant.

Ren G, Zhang H, Lin X, Zhu J, Jia Z - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments.Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage.These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China ; Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions [low nitrogen fertilization (LN) and high nitrogen fertilization (HN)]. The results revealed that the leaf endophytic bacterial community was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria-affiliated families, such as Enterobacteriaceae and Xanthomonadaceae, which represent 28.7-86.8% and 2.14-42.6% of the total sequence reads, respectively, at all tested growth stages. The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments. The eCO2 effect on the bacterial communities differed greatly under different nitrogen application conditions and at different growth stages. Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage. These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

No MeSH data available.


The OTUs number (A) and Shannon index (B). The OTUs number and Shannon index were obtained by using 2,800 subsampled sequence reads from each community. The different letters represent significant differences (P < 0.05; Duncan’s multiple range test). All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
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Figure 2: The OTUs number (A) and Shannon index (B). The OTUs number and Shannon index were obtained by using 2,800 subsampled sequence reads from each community. The different letters represent significant differences (P < 0.05; Duncan’s multiple range test). All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.

Mentions: The observed OTUs (Figure 2A) and the Shannon index (Figure 2B) was used to compare the bacterial richness and diversity, respectively, based on subsampled same number of sequences (2,800 sequences per sample, at which sequence depth the majority of the OTUs have been captured based on the mean sequence coverage (87.2%), which was determined by the good’s coverage). We did not observe consistent changes that could be attributed to eCO2, N fertilization, or different growth stages. For example, eCO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the bacterial richness (Figure 2A) and diversity (Figure 2B) under high N fertilization (HN) at the tillering stage, whereas no significant effect was observed at this stage under the low N fertilization (LN) treatment and at other growth stages under the LN and HN treatments. Enhanced N fertilization significantly (P < 0.05) increased the bacterial richness (Figure 2A) and diversity (Figure 2B) under ambient CO2 treatment at the filling stage but it did not show significant influence under eCO2 condition at this stage. In addition, no significant differences between LN and HN were observed at the tillering or maturity stage.


Response of leaf endophytic bacterial community to elevated CO2 at different growth stages of rice plant.

Ren G, Zhang H, Lin X, Zhu J, Jia Z - Front Microbiol (2015)

The OTUs number (A) and Shannon index (B). The OTUs number and Shannon index were obtained by using 2,800 subsampled sequence reads from each community. The different letters represent significant differences (P < 0.05; Duncan’s multiple range test). All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553393&req=5

Figure 2: The OTUs number (A) and Shannon index (B). The OTUs number and Shannon index were obtained by using 2,800 subsampled sequence reads from each community. The different letters represent significant differences (P < 0.05; Duncan’s multiple range test). All other designations are the same as those in Figure 1.
Mentions: The observed OTUs (Figure 2A) and the Shannon index (Figure 2B) was used to compare the bacterial richness and diversity, respectively, based on subsampled same number of sequences (2,800 sequences per sample, at which sequence depth the majority of the OTUs have been captured based on the mean sequence coverage (87.2%), which was determined by the good’s coverage). We did not observe consistent changes that could be attributed to eCO2, N fertilization, or different growth stages. For example, eCO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the bacterial richness (Figure 2A) and diversity (Figure 2B) under high N fertilization (HN) at the tillering stage, whereas no significant effect was observed at this stage under the low N fertilization (LN) treatment and at other growth stages under the LN and HN treatments. Enhanced N fertilization significantly (P < 0.05) increased the bacterial richness (Figure 2A) and diversity (Figure 2B) under ambient CO2 treatment at the filling stage but it did not show significant influence under eCO2 condition at this stage. In addition, no significant differences between LN and HN were observed at the tillering or maturity stage.

Bottom Line: The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments.Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage.These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China ; Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science - Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and health. In the context of climate change, the response of plant endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 at different rice growing stages is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) at the tillering, filling, and maturity stages of the rice plant under different nitrogen fertilization conditions [low nitrogen fertilization (LN) and high nitrogen fertilization (HN)]. The results revealed that the leaf endophytic bacterial community was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria-affiliated families, such as Enterobacteriaceae and Xanthomonadaceae, which represent 28.7-86.8% and 2.14-42.6% of the total sequence reads, respectively, at all tested growth stages. The difference in the bacterial community structure between the different growth stages was greater than the difference resulting from the CO2 and nitrogen fertilization treatments. The eCO2 effect on the bacterial communities differed greatly under different nitrogen application conditions and at different growth stages. Specifically, eCO2 revealed a significant effect on the community structure under both LN and HN levels at the tillering stage; however, the significant effect of eCO2 was only observed under HN, rather than under the LN condition at the filling stage; no significant effect of eCO2 on the community structure at both the LN and HN fertilization levels was found at the maturity stage. These results provide useful insights into the response of leaf endophytic bacterial communities to elevated CO2 across rice growth stages.

No MeSH data available.