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A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa.

Selby EA, Cornelius T, Fehling KB, Kranzler A, Panza EA, Lavender JM, Wonderlich SA, Crosby RD, Engel SG, Mitchell JE, Crow SJ, Peterson CB, Le Grange D - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device.Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity.The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Rutgers University , Piscataway, NJ, USA.

ABSTRACT
Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as "emotional instability." The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Color-coded representation of participants’ emotional and behavioral experience at each signal recording during the monitoring period, group by anorexia subtype. One horizontal line reflects one participant’s recordings. Dark red and green indicate elevations (two standard deviations) above the mean in negative and positive emotion, respectively. For the negative and positive emotion lines, white squares indicate non-completed assessments. Light blue squares indicate when a single weight loss activity was reported; dark blue squares represent three or more activities reported at that signal.
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Figure 3: Color-coded representation of participants’ emotional and behavioral experience at each signal recording during the monitoring period, group by anorexia subtype. One horizontal line reflects one participant’s recordings. Dark red and green indicate elevations (two standard deviations) above the mean in negative and positive emotion, respectively. For the negative and positive emotion lines, white squares indicate non-completed assessments. Light blue squares indicate when a single weight loss activity was reported; dark blue squares represent three or more activities reported at that signal.

Mentions: In order to obtain a qualitative representation of emotional fluctuations for participants across the duration of monitoring, we generated a color-coded figure where each signal was coded for each participant across the duration of monitoring (see Figure 3). Light red and green boxes indicate low levels (one standard deviation below average) of negative and positive emotion, respectively, and dark red and green boxes indicate elevated levels of positive and negative emotion (one standard deviation above average), respectively. This figure also contains blue squares, the darker of which indicate signals where one or more weight loss behaviors was engaged in. As can be seen in this figure, many participants demonstrated frequent and intense fluctuations in both negative and positive emotion, as well as variation in number of behaviors reported.


A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa.

Selby EA, Cornelius T, Fehling KB, Kranzler A, Panza EA, Lavender JM, Wonderlich SA, Crosby RD, Engel SG, Mitchell JE, Crow SJ, Peterson CB, Le Grange D - Front Psychol (2015)

Color-coded representation of participants’ emotional and behavioral experience at each signal recording during the monitoring period, group by anorexia subtype. One horizontal line reflects one participant’s recordings. Dark red and green indicate elevations (two standard deviations) above the mean in negative and positive emotion, respectively. For the negative and positive emotion lines, white squares indicate non-completed assessments. Light blue squares indicate when a single weight loss activity was reported; dark blue squares represent three or more activities reported at that signal.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553383&req=5

Figure 3: Color-coded representation of participants’ emotional and behavioral experience at each signal recording during the monitoring period, group by anorexia subtype. One horizontal line reflects one participant’s recordings. Dark red and green indicate elevations (two standard deviations) above the mean in negative and positive emotion, respectively. For the negative and positive emotion lines, white squares indicate non-completed assessments. Light blue squares indicate when a single weight loss activity was reported; dark blue squares represent three or more activities reported at that signal.
Mentions: In order to obtain a qualitative representation of emotional fluctuations for participants across the duration of monitoring, we generated a color-coded figure where each signal was coded for each participant across the duration of monitoring (see Figure 3). Light red and green boxes indicate low levels (one standard deviation below average) of negative and positive emotion, respectively, and dark red and green boxes indicate elevated levels of positive and negative emotion (one standard deviation above average), respectively. This figure also contains blue squares, the darker of which indicate signals where one or more weight loss behaviors was engaged in. As can be seen in this figure, many participants demonstrated frequent and intense fluctuations in both negative and positive emotion, as well as variation in number of behaviors reported.

Bottom Line: Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device.Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity.The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Rutgers University , Piscataway, NJ, USA.

ABSTRACT
Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as "emotional instability." The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus