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Nasalance in Cochlear Implantees.

Sebastian S, Sreedevi N, Lepcha A, Mathew J - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2015)

Bottom Line: Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss.Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech.The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss. Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech. Auditory information received from cochlear implants is expected to be far superior to that from hearing aids. Our study aimed at comparing the percentages of nasality in the speech of the cochlear implantees with hearing aid users and also with children with normal hearing.

Methods: Three groups of subjects took part in the study. Groups I and II comprised 12 children each, in the age range of 4-10 years, with prelingual bilateral profound hearing loss, using multichannel cochlear implants and digital hearing aids respectively. Both groups had received at least one year of speech therapy intervention since cochlear implant surgery and hearing aid fitting respectively. The third group consisted of age-matched and sex-matched children with normal hearing. The subjects were asked to say a sentence which consisted of only oral sounds and no nasal sounds ("Buy baby a bib"). The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated.

Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the children using hearing aids showed a high percentage of nasalance in their speech. The cochlear implantees showed a lower percentage of nasalance compared to children using hearing aids, but did not match with their normal hearing peers.

Conclusion: The quality of speech of the cochlear implantees was superior to that of the hearing aid users, but did not match with the normal controls. The study suggests that acoustic variables still exist after cochlear implantation in children, with hearing impairments at deviant levels, which needs attention. Further research needs to be carried out to explore the effect of the age at implantation as a variable in reducing nasality in the speech and attaining normative values in cochlear implantees, and also between unilateral versus bilateral implantees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of means of the three groups.
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Figure 1: Comparison of means of the three groups.

Mentions: The mean nasalance score was 65.54% for the hearing aid users group, 45.0% for the cochlear implantees, and 35.37% for the normal control group (Fig. 1). One-way ANOVA revealed a statistically significant differences between all three groups (P<0.001) (Table 4). Each group was compared with the other two groups using the Bonferroni test (Table 5).


Nasalance in Cochlear Implantees.

Sebastian S, Sreedevi N, Lepcha A, Mathew J - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2015)

Comparison of means of the three groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553348&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison of means of the three groups.
Mentions: The mean nasalance score was 65.54% for the hearing aid users group, 45.0% for the cochlear implantees, and 35.37% for the normal control group (Fig. 1). One-way ANOVA revealed a statistically significant differences between all three groups (P<0.001) (Table 4). Each group was compared with the other two groups using the Bonferroni test (Table 5).

Bottom Line: Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss.Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech.The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss. Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech. Auditory information received from cochlear implants is expected to be far superior to that from hearing aids. Our study aimed at comparing the percentages of nasality in the speech of the cochlear implantees with hearing aid users and also with children with normal hearing.

Methods: Three groups of subjects took part in the study. Groups I and II comprised 12 children each, in the age range of 4-10 years, with prelingual bilateral profound hearing loss, using multichannel cochlear implants and digital hearing aids respectively. Both groups had received at least one year of speech therapy intervention since cochlear implant surgery and hearing aid fitting respectively. The third group consisted of age-matched and sex-matched children with normal hearing. The subjects were asked to say a sentence which consisted of only oral sounds and no nasal sounds ("Buy baby a bib"). The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated.

Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the children using hearing aids showed a high percentage of nasalance in their speech. The cochlear implantees showed a lower percentage of nasalance compared to children using hearing aids, but did not match with their normal hearing peers.

Conclusion: The quality of speech of the cochlear implantees was superior to that of the hearing aid users, but did not match with the normal controls. The study suggests that acoustic variables still exist after cochlear implantation in children, with hearing impairments at deviant levels, which needs attention. Further research needs to be carried out to explore the effect of the age at implantation as a variable in reducing nasality in the speech and attaining normative values in cochlear implantees, and also between unilateral versus bilateral implantees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus