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Subclavian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Formation 3 Months after a Game of Rugby Union.

Evans T, Roy S, Rocker M - Case Rep Emerg Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We report a case of delayed diagnosis of a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm after a closed fracture of the clavicle in a 15-year-old patient, 3 months after the original injury while playing rugby union.This case highlights the need for clinical vigilance when assessing patients, particularly on repeated occasions when their recovery appears to be impaired.A thorough history and clinical examination can raise suspicion of even rare occurrences and aid prompt management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Llantrisant CF72 8XR, UK.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms of the subclavian artery remain a rare complication after fracture of the clavicle. We report a case of delayed diagnosis of a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm after a closed fracture of the clavicle in a 15-year-old patient, 3 months after the original injury while playing rugby union. Despite several attendances to the Emergency Department with vague symptoms, the final diagnosis was confirmed by duplex ultrasound and Computed Tomography of the thorax. Surgical repair was indicated due to acute limb ischaemia from distal embolisation from a large pseudoaneurysm, with the patient making a full recovery. This case highlights the need for clinical vigilance when assessing patients, particularly on repeated occasions when their recovery appears to be impaired. A thorough history and clinical examination can raise suspicion of even rare occurrences and aid prompt management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AP X-ray indicating minimally displaced mid-clavicle fracture.
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fig1: AP X-ray indicating minimally displaced mid-clavicle fracture.

Mentions: A 15-year-old boy attended the Emergency Department (ED) with a short history of a pale left arm. He denied pain but complained of some altered sensation throughout his left hand. He had a significant recent medical history, having suffered a fractured midshaft of his left clavicle (see Figure 1) managed conservatively with a broad arm sling 3 months previously. Furthermore, he had 3 recent attendances to the ED with pain and “pins and needles” which felt like “a trapped nerve,” the first of which was a sudden onset of clavicular pain and altered sensation on throwing a ball. At each ED visit he was assessed, reassured, and discharged with documentation stating “no neurovascular deficit.”


Subclavian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Formation 3 Months after a Game of Rugby Union.

Evans T, Roy S, Rocker M - Case Rep Emerg Med (2015)

AP X-ray indicating minimally displaced mid-clavicle fracture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553312&req=5

fig1: AP X-ray indicating minimally displaced mid-clavicle fracture.
Mentions: A 15-year-old boy attended the Emergency Department (ED) with a short history of a pale left arm. He denied pain but complained of some altered sensation throughout his left hand. He had a significant recent medical history, having suffered a fractured midshaft of his left clavicle (see Figure 1) managed conservatively with a broad arm sling 3 months previously. Furthermore, he had 3 recent attendances to the ED with pain and “pins and needles” which felt like “a trapped nerve,” the first of which was a sudden onset of clavicular pain and altered sensation on throwing a ball. At each ED visit he was assessed, reassured, and discharged with documentation stating “no neurovascular deficit.”

Bottom Line: We report a case of delayed diagnosis of a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm after a closed fracture of the clavicle in a 15-year-old patient, 3 months after the original injury while playing rugby union.This case highlights the need for clinical vigilance when assessing patients, particularly on repeated occasions when their recovery appears to be impaired.A thorough history and clinical examination can raise suspicion of even rare occurrences and aid prompt management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Llantrisant CF72 8XR, UK.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms of the subclavian artery remain a rare complication after fracture of the clavicle. We report a case of delayed diagnosis of a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm after a closed fracture of the clavicle in a 15-year-old patient, 3 months after the original injury while playing rugby union. Despite several attendances to the Emergency Department with vague symptoms, the final diagnosis was confirmed by duplex ultrasound and Computed Tomography of the thorax. Surgical repair was indicated due to acute limb ischaemia from distal embolisation from a large pseudoaneurysm, with the patient making a full recovery. This case highlights the need for clinical vigilance when assessing patients, particularly on repeated occasions when their recovery appears to be impaired. A thorough history and clinical examination can raise suspicion of even rare occurrences and aid prompt management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus