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Prognostic Implications of Serum Lipid Metabolism over Time during Sepsis.

Lee SH, Park MS, Park BH, Jung WJ, Lee IS, Kim SY, Kim EY, Jung JY, Kang YA, Kim YS, Kim SK, Chang J, Chung KS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7.In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.).According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Chest Diseases, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite extensive research and an improved standard of care, sepsis remains a disorder with a high mortality rate. Sepsis is accompanied by severe metabolic alterations.

Methods: We evaluated 117 patients with sepsis (severe sepsis [n = 19] and septic shock [n = 98]) who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), free fatty acid (FFA), and apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I levels were measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7.

Results: Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.). According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.).

Conclusions: Our study illustrated that TG levels are associated with mortality in patients with sepsis. This may be attributable to alterations in serum lipid metabolism during sepsis, thus modulating the host response to inflammation in critically ill patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time course of lipid levels in the survivor and nonsurvivor groups. Data for cholesterol (a), triglyceride (b), high-density lipoprotein (c), low-density lipoprotein (d), free fatty acid (e), and apolipoprotein A-I (f) are shown. Data were collected on the day of admission and days 1, 3, and 7 after admission. The circle and bar represent the mean value and standard error of the mean, respectively. Significant differences between the survivor and nonsurvivor groups are indicated by ∗.
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fig2: Time course of lipid levels in the survivor and nonsurvivor groups. Data for cholesterol (a), triglyceride (b), high-density lipoprotein (c), low-density lipoprotein (d), free fatty acid (e), and apolipoprotein A-I (f) are shown. Data were collected on the day of admission and days 1, 3, and 7 after admission. The circle and bar represent the mean value and standard error of the mean, respectively. Significant differences between the survivor and nonsurvivor groups are indicated by ∗.

Mentions: The changes in serum lipid levels over time are shown in Figure 2. Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels were investigated from the day of admission to the ICU (day 0) to day 7. Changes in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the two groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.010, p = 0.005, and p = 0.006, resp.). However, changes in cholesterol and HDL levels over time did not differ significantly between the two groups. At different time points, there was a significant gap in the mean value for each lipid and lipoprotein between the two groups. Cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the survivor group on days 3 and 7 compared to those of the nonsurvivor group. In addition, TG content was significantly elevated in the survivor group on days 0 and 1. Furthermore, significant differences were observed for HDL on day 3, LDL on day 7, FFA on day 0, and Apo A-I on day 7.


Prognostic Implications of Serum Lipid Metabolism over Time during Sepsis.

Lee SH, Park MS, Park BH, Jung WJ, Lee IS, Kim SY, Kim EY, Jung JY, Kang YA, Kim YS, Kim SK, Chang J, Chung KS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Time course of lipid levels in the survivor and nonsurvivor groups. Data for cholesterol (a), triglyceride (b), high-density lipoprotein (c), low-density lipoprotein (d), free fatty acid (e), and apolipoprotein A-I (f) are shown. Data were collected on the day of admission and days 1, 3, and 7 after admission. The circle and bar represent the mean value and standard error of the mean, respectively. Significant differences between the survivor and nonsurvivor groups are indicated by ∗.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553311&req=5

fig2: Time course of lipid levels in the survivor and nonsurvivor groups. Data for cholesterol (a), triglyceride (b), high-density lipoprotein (c), low-density lipoprotein (d), free fatty acid (e), and apolipoprotein A-I (f) are shown. Data were collected on the day of admission and days 1, 3, and 7 after admission. The circle and bar represent the mean value and standard error of the mean, respectively. Significant differences between the survivor and nonsurvivor groups are indicated by ∗.
Mentions: The changes in serum lipid levels over time are shown in Figure 2. Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels were investigated from the day of admission to the ICU (day 0) to day 7. Changes in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the two groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.010, p = 0.005, and p = 0.006, resp.). However, changes in cholesterol and HDL levels over time did not differ significantly between the two groups. At different time points, there was a significant gap in the mean value for each lipid and lipoprotein between the two groups. Cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the survivor group on days 3 and 7 compared to those of the nonsurvivor group. In addition, TG content was significantly elevated in the survivor group on days 0 and 1. Furthermore, significant differences were observed for HDL on day 3, LDL on day 7, FFA on day 0, and Apo A-I on day 7.

Bottom Line: Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7.In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.).According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Chest Diseases, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite extensive research and an improved standard of care, sepsis remains a disorder with a high mortality rate. Sepsis is accompanied by severe metabolic alterations.

Methods: We evaluated 117 patients with sepsis (severe sepsis [n = 19] and septic shock [n = 98]) who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), free fatty acid (FFA), and apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I levels were measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7.

Results: Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.). According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.).

Conclusions: Our study illustrated that TG levels are associated with mortality in patients with sepsis. This may be attributable to alterations in serum lipid metabolism during sepsis, thus modulating the host response to inflammation in critically ill patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus