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Purple Urine Bag Syndrome in Two Elderly Men with Urinary Tract Infection.

Van Keer J, Detroyer D, Bammens B - Case Rep Nephrol (2015)

Bottom Line: The second case is an 80-year-old man who was admitted for heart failure with cardiorenal dilemma and who was started on intermittent hemodialysis.He was diagnosed with an E. coli urinary infection and treated with amoxicillin and removal of the indwelling catheter.These two cases illustrate the typical characteristics of purple urine bag syndrome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Purple urine bag syndrome is a rare condition in which purple discoloration of urine inside its collection bag occurs. We describe two illustrative cases. The first patient is an 81-year-old man who was hospitalized for a newly diagnosed lymphoma with acute obstructive renal failure for which a nephrostomy procedure was performed. During the hospitalization, a sudden purple discoloration of the suprapubic catheter urine was noted, while the nephrostomy urine had a normal color. Urine culture from the suprapubic catheter was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis; urine from the nephrostomy was sterile. The second case is an 80-year-old man who was admitted for heart failure with cardiorenal dilemma and who was started on intermittent hemodialysis. There was a sudden purple discoloration of the urine in the collection bag from his indwelling catheter. He was diagnosed with an E. coli urinary infection and treated with amoxicillin and removal of the indwelling catheter. These two cases illustrate the typical characteristics of purple urine bag syndrome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Purple color of the urine bag. Note that the color of the urine in the collection device before entering the bag is normal.
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fig2: Purple color of the urine bag. Note that the color of the urine in the collection device before entering the bag is normal.

Mentions: On the 13th day of hospitalization, the urine inside the urine bag suddenly turned purple (see Figure 2). The patient had a burning sensation in the lower abdomen. Vital parameters were unremarkable. Physical examination showed bilateral basal crepitations on auscultation, systolic cardiac murmur, mild peripheral edema, and indwelling urinary catheter with remarkable purple color of the collecting bag, while the urine in the tubing before the bag had a normal color. Laboratory assessment showed anemia (hemoglobin 8.9 g/dL) with mild macrocytosis, normal leukocyte count and differentiation, and platelets of 115 × 109/L. Creatinine before dialysis was 3.11 mg/dL and blood urea nitrogen was 48 mg/dL. Liver function tests were normal. CRP was 23 mg/L (reference value < 5 mg/L). Urine analysis showed pyuria and trace hematuria; urinary pH was 8.5. Culture was positive for Escherichia coli. The indwelling catheter was removed. The patient was treated with amoxicillin for 7 days. He was discharged in good health, with continuation of thrice-weekly hemodialysis. Shortly thereafter, the patient developed urinary obstruction for which a permanent suprapubic catheter was placed. The purple urine color never recurred.


Purple Urine Bag Syndrome in Two Elderly Men with Urinary Tract Infection.

Van Keer J, Detroyer D, Bammens B - Case Rep Nephrol (2015)

Purple color of the urine bag. Note that the color of the urine in the collection device before entering the bag is normal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553271&req=5

fig2: Purple color of the urine bag. Note that the color of the urine in the collection device before entering the bag is normal.
Mentions: On the 13th day of hospitalization, the urine inside the urine bag suddenly turned purple (see Figure 2). The patient had a burning sensation in the lower abdomen. Vital parameters were unremarkable. Physical examination showed bilateral basal crepitations on auscultation, systolic cardiac murmur, mild peripheral edema, and indwelling urinary catheter with remarkable purple color of the collecting bag, while the urine in the tubing before the bag had a normal color. Laboratory assessment showed anemia (hemoglobin 8.9 g/dL) with mild macrocytosis, normal leukocyte count and differentiation, and platelets of 115 × 109/L. Creatinine before dialysis was 3.11 mg/dL and blood urea nitrogen was 48 mg/dL. Liver function tests were normal. CRP was 23 mg/L (reference value < 5 mg/L). Urine analysis showed pyuria and trace hematuria; urinary pH was 8.5. Culture was positive for Escherichia coli. The indwelling catheter was removed. The patient was treated with amoxicillin for 7 days. He was discharged in good health, with continuation of thrice-weekly hemodialysis. Shortly thereafter, the patient developed urinary obstruction for which a permanent suprapubic catheter was placed. The purple urine color never recurred.

Bottom Line: The second case is an 80-year-old man who was admitted for heart failure with cardiorenal dilemma and who was started on intermittent hemodialysis.He was diagnosed with an E. coli urinary infection and treated with amoxicillin and removal of the indwelling catheter.These two cases illustrate the typical characteristics of purple urine bag syndrome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Purple urine bag syndrome is a rare condition in which purple discoloration of urine inside its collection bag occurs. We describe two illustrative cases. The first patient is an 81-year-old man who was hospitalized for a newly diagnosed lymphoma with acute obstructive renal failure for which a nephrostomy procedure was performed. During the hospitalization, a sudden purple discoloration of the suprapubic catheter urine was noted, while the nephrostomy urine had a normal color. Urine culture from the suprapubic catheter was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis; urine from the nephrostomy was sterile. The second case is an 80-year-old man who was admitted for heart failure with cardiorenal dilemma and who was started on intermittent hemodialysis. There was a sudden purple discoloration of the urine in the collection bag from his indwelling catheter. He was diagnosed with an E. coli urinary infection and treated with amoxicillin and removal of the indwelling catheter. These two cases illustrate the typical characteristics of purple urine bag syndrome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus