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Specialist mental health services in England in 2014: overview of funding, access and levels of care.

Docherty M, Thornicroft G - Int J Ment Health Syst (2015)

Bottom Line: This paper presents information from a wider range of official, research and grey literature sources aiming to: (1) assess whether governmental investment in publically funded mental health services has declined since the start of the economic recession in 2008; (2) to assess whether relative changes in mental health service investment over this period were or were not similar to trends in national investment in services for people with physical disorders, and (3) to interpret these findings in terms of met and unmet population levels needs for mental health care.The key findings are that: across England social service expenditure reductions have led to a decrease of 48 % in the number of people with mental illness who receive such care, while direct NHS expenditure was reduced in some local areas by up to 32 %.The results of this overview suggest that there have been substantial reductions in the resources dedicated to mental health treatment and care in England since 2008, that such reductions seem not to have been applied to physical health services, and that these findings appear to run counter to the government policy of 'parity of esteem; for mental and physical healthcare.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK ; South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the economic recession began in 2008 anecdotal reports suggest that mental health services in England have experienced disinvestment, but published data to test this proposition are few.

Method: This paper presents information from a wider range of official, research and grey literature sources aiming to: (1) assess whether governmental investment in publically funded mental health services has declined since the start of the economic recession in 2008; (2) to assess whether relative changes in mental health service investment over this period were or were not similar to trends in national investment in services for people with physical disorders, and (3) to interpret these findings in terms of met and unmet population levels needs for mental health care.

Results: The key findings are that: across England social service expenditure reductions have led to a decrease of 48 % in the number of people with mental illness who receive such care, while direct NHS expenditure was reduced in some local areas by up to 32 %.

Conclusions: The results of this overview suggest that there have been substantial reductions in the resources dedicated to mental health treatment and care in England since 2008, that such reductions seem not to have been applied to physical health services, and that these findings appear to run counter to the government policy of 'parity of esteem; for mental and physical healthcare.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Total real investment in adult mental health services 2001/02 to 2011/12 (at 2011/12 pay and price levels). Source [34]
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Fig3: Total real investment in adult mental health services 2001/02 to 2011/12 (at 2011/12 pay and price levels). Source [34]

Mentions: There is evidence that there have been reductions in investment in community mental health services in recent years (see Figs. 3, 4). The 2011/12 survey, for example, found that investment in mental health services for adults of working age (aged 18–64), to a total of £6.629 billion, fell in real terms from the previous year. This was the first real terms drop in investment since the survey began in 2001/02 [19]. Between 2010/11 and 2011/12 investment across the three priority areas in community mental health services (crisis resolution, early intervention and assertive outreach) fell, for the first time in a decade, by £29.3 million from £520 million to £490.7 million. This is significant given the evidence base for these services in reducing admissions to hospital and the continuing demand for acute beds [20]. Funding for older people’s mental health services was found to be under greater pressure, with a 1 % fall in resource allocation in the previous year to £2.830 billion in 2011/12. After allowing for inflation of service costs, this amounts to a real terms cut of 3.1 per cent. There is also evidence to suggest significant regional variations, for example service reductions being greater in London than in other parts of England [21].Fig. 3


Specialist mental health services in England in 2014: overview of funding, access and levels of care.

Docherty M, Thornicroft G - Int J Ment Health Syst (2015)

Total real investment in adult mental health services 2001/02 to 2011/12 (at 2011/12 pay and price levels). Source [34]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4553216&req=5

Fig3: Total real investment in adult mental health services 2001/02 to 2011/12 (at 2011/12 pay and price levels). Source [34]
Mentions: There is evidence that there have been reductions in investment in community mental health services in recent years (see Figs. 3, 4). The 2011/12 survey, for example, found that investment in mental health services for adults of working age (aged 18–64), to a total of £6.629 billion, fell in real terms from the previous year. This was the first real terms drop in investment since the survey began in 2001/02 [19]. Between 2010/11 and 2011/12 investment across the three priority areas in community mental health services (crisis resolution, early intervention and assertive outreach) fell, for the first time in a decade, by £29.3 million from £520 million to £490.7 million. This is significant given the evidence base for these services in reducing admissions to hospital and the continuing demand for acute beds [20]. Funding for older people’s mental health services was found to be under greater pressure, with a 1 % fall in resource allocation in the previous year to £2.830 billion in 2011/12. After allowing for inflation of service costs, this amounts to a real terms cut of 3.1 per cent. There is also evidence to suggest significant regional variations, for example service reductions being greater in London than in other parts of England [21].Fig. 3

Bottom Line: This paper presents information from a wider range of official, research and grey literature sources aiming to: (1) assess whether governmental investment in publically funded mental health services has declined since the start of the economic recession in 2008; (2) to assess whether relative changes in mental health service investment over this period were or were not similar to trends in national investment in services for people with physical disorders, and (3) to interpret these findings in terms of met and unmet population levels needs for mental health care.The key findings are that: across England social service expenditure reductions have led to a decrease of 48 % in the number of people with mental illness who receive such care, while direct NHS expenditure was reduced in some local areas by up to 32 %.The results of this overview suggest that there have been substantial reductions in the resources dedicated to mental health treatment and care in England since 2008, that such reductions seem not to have been applied to physical health services, and that these findings appear to run counter to the government policy of 'parity of esteem; for mental and physical healthcare.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK ; South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the economic recession began in 2008 anecdotal reports suggest that mental health services in England have experienced disinvestment, but published data to test this proposition are few.

Method: This paper presents information from a wider range of official, research and grey literature sources aiming to: (1) assess whether governmental investment in publically funded mental health services has declined since the start of the economic recession in 2008; (2) to assess whether relative changes in mental health service investment over this period were or were not similar to trends in national investment in services for people with physical disorders, and (3) to interpret these findings in terms of met and unmet population levels needs for mental health care.

Results: The key findings are that: across England social service expenditure reductions have led to a decrease of 48 % in the number of people with mental illness who receive such care, while direct NHS expenditure was reduced in some local areas by up to 32 %.

Conclusions: The results of this overview suggest that there have been substantial reductions in the resources dedicated to mental health treatment and care in England since 2008, that such reductions seem not to have been applied to physical health services, and that these findings appear to run counter to the government policy of 'parity of esteem; for mental and physical healthcare.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus