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Production of porous Calcium Phosphate (CaP) ceramics with aligned pores using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion.

Choi WY, Kim HE, Moon YW, Shin KH, Koh YH - Biomater Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with aligned pores were successfully produced using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion.The porous CaP scaffolds showed excellent in vitro biocompatibility, suggesting their potential as the bone scaffold.Aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with considerably enhanced mechanical properties and tailorable porosity would find very useful applications as the bone scaffold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics are one of the most valuable biomaterials for uses as the bone scaffold owing to their outstanding biocompatability, bioactivity, and biodegradation nature. In particular, these materials with an open porous structure can stimulate bone ingrowth into their 3-dimensionally interconnected pores. However, the creation of pores in bulk materials would inevitably cause a severe reduction in mechanical properties. Thus, it is a challenge to explore new ways of improving the mechanical properties of porous CaP scaffolds without scarifying their high porosity.

Results: Porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with aligned pores were successfully produced using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion. This aligned porous structure allowed for the achievement of high compressive strength when tested parallel to the direction of aligned pores. In addition, the overall porosity and mechanical properties of the aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds could be tailored simply by adjusting the initial CaP content in the CaP/camphene slurry. The porous CaP scaffolds showed excellent in vitro biocompatibility, suggesting their potential as the bone scaffold.

Conclusions: Aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with considerably enhanced mechanical properties and tailorable porosity would find very useful applications as the bone scaffold.

No MeSH data available.


Representative FE-SEM images of the MC3T3-E1 cells on aligned porous CaP scaffolds produced with various CaP contents: (a) 15 vol%, (b) 20 vol%, and (c) 25 vol%. Arrows indicate cells attached on the samples
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Fig7: Representative FE-SEM images of the MC3T3-E1 cells on aligned porous CaP scaffolds produced with various CaP contents: (a) 15 vol%, (b) 20 vol%, and (c) 25 vol%. Arrows indicate cells attached on the samples

Mentions: To evaluate the potential of the porous CaP ceramics with aligned pores for bone tissue regeneration, their in vitro biocompatibility was evaluated using a pre-osteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1). Basically, all of the samples showed that a number of the cells, indicted by the arrows, adhered to and spread actively on the surfaces of the CaP frameworks after 24 h of culturing, as shown in Fig. 7 (a)-(c). This was attributed to excellent osteoblast activity owing to the co-existence of HA and β-TCP phases [5]. This finding suggests that aligned porous CaP scaffolds would provide a favorable environment for bone ingrowth.Fig. 7


Production of porous Calcium Phosphate (CaP) ceramics with aligned pores using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion.

Choi WY, Kim HE, Moon YW, Shin KH, Koh YH - Biomater Res (2015)

Representative FE-SEM images of the MC3T3-E1 cells on aligned porous CaP scaffolds produced with various CaP contents: (a) 15 vol%, (b) 20 vol%, and (c) 25 vol%. Arrows indicate cells attached on the samples
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4552288&req=5

Fig7: Representative FE-SEM images of the MC3T3-E1 cells on aligned porous CaP scaffolds produced with various CaP contents: (a) 15 vol%, (b) 20 vol%, and (c) 25 vol%. Arrows indicate cells attached on the samples
Mentions: To evaluate the potential of the porous CaP ceramics with aligned pores for bone tissue regeneration, their in vitro biocompatibility was evaluated using a pre-osteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1). Basically, all of the samples showed that a number of the cells, indicted by the arrows, adhered to and spread actively on the surfaces of the CaP frameworks after 24 h of culturing, as shown in Fig. 7 (a)-(c). This was attributed to excellent osteoblast activity owing to the co-existence of HA and β-TCP phases [5]. This finding suggests that aligned porous CaP scaffolds would provide a favorable environment for bone ingrowth.Fig. 7

Bottom Line: Porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with aligned pores were successfully produced using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion.The porous CaP scaffolds showed excellent in vitro biocompatibility, suggesting their potential as the bone scaffold.Aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with considerably enhanced mechanical properties and tailorable porosity would find very useful applications as the bone scaffold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics are one of the most valuable biomaterials for uses as the bone scaffold owing to their outstanding biocompatability, bioactivity, and biodegradation nature. In particular, these materials with an open porous structure can stimulate bone ingrowth into their 3-dimensionally interconnected pores. However, the creation of pores in bulk materials would inevitably cause a severe reduction in mechanical properties. Thus, it is a challenge to explore new ways of improving the mechanical properties of porous CaP scaffolds without scarifying their high porosity.

Results: Porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with aligned pores were successfully produced using ceramic/camphene-based co-extrusion. This aligned porous structure allowed for the achievement of high compressive strength when tested parallel to the direction of aligned pores. In addition, the overall porosity and mechanical properties of the aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds could be tailored simply by adjusting the initial CaP content in the CaP/camphene slurry. The porous CaP scaffolds showed excellent in vitro biocompatibility, suggesting their potential as the bone scaffold.

Conclusions: Aligned porous CaP ceramic scaffolds with considerably enhanced mechanical properties and tailorable porosity would find very useful applications as the bone scaffold.

No MeSH data available.