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Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

Shin YC, Lee JH, Jin L, Kim MJ, Oh JW, Kim TW, Han DW - Biomater Res (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices.Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices.These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage).

Results: The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices.

Conclusions: These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cell morphology of HDFs grown on electrospun nanofiber matrices. SEM images of HDFs cultured on pure PLGA nanofiber matrices (A) and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices (B) for 3 days (magnification: in A and C, × 500 and in B and D, × 2,000). All photographs shown in this figure are representative of six independent experiments with similar results.
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Fig6: Cell morphology of HDFs grown on electrospun nanofiber matrices. SEM images of HDFs cultured on pure PLGA nanofiber matrices (A) and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices (B) for 3 days (magnification: in A and C, × 500 and in B and D, × 2,000). All photographs shown in this figure are representative of six independent experiments with similar results.

Mentions: SEM images of HDFs cultured on the pure PLGA and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were presented on Figure 6. As shown in Figure 6A, HDFs cultured on pure PLGA matrix showed abnormal morphologies because the cells could not properly attach to the matrices. In contrast, HDFs cultured on hybrid matrices presented typical and well-spread morphology (Figure 6B). This result indicated that the cells were effectively attached and grown on the hybrid matrices. Previous reports documented that the RGD peptides containing scaffolds enhance cellular activities of various cell types including attachment, proliferation and differentiation [36–38]. Moreover, the hybrid matrices were good at support cellular growth without losing their nanofibrous structure even in the cell culture environment. Therefore, it is demonstrated that the hybrid matrices are biofunctional scaffolds which can improve cellular behaviors as well as induce cellular attachment.Figure 6


Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

Shin YC, Lee JH, Jin L, Kim MJ, Oh JW, Kim TW, Han DW - Biomater Res (2014)

Cell morphology of HDFs grown on electrospun nanofiber matrices. SEM images of HDFs cultured on pure PLGA nanofiber matrices (A) and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices (B) for 3 days (magnification: in A and C, × 500 and in B and D, × 2,000). All photographs shown in this figure are representative of six independent experiments with similar results.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4552277&req=5

Fig6: Cell morphology of HDFs grown on electrospun nanofiber matrices. SEM images of HDFs cultured on pure PLGA nanofiber matrices (A) and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices (B) for 3 days (magnification: in A and C, × 500 and in B and D, × 2,000). All photographs shown in this figure are representative of six independent experiments with similar results.
Mentions: SEM images of HDFs cultured on the pure PLGA and RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were presented on Figure 6. As shown in Figure 6A, HDFs cultured on pure PLGA matrix showed abnormal morphologies because the cells could not properly attach to the matrices. In contrast, HDFs cultured on hybrid matrices presented typical and well-spread morphology (Figure 6B). This result indicated that the cells were effectively attached and grown on the hybrid matrices. Previous reports documented that the RGD peptides containing scaffolds enhance cellular activities of various cell types including attachment, proliferation and differentiation [36–38]. Moreover, the hybrid matrices were good at support cellular growth without losing their nanofibrous structure even in the cell culture environment. Therefore, it is demonstrated that the hybrid matrices are biofunctional scaffolds which can improve cellular behaviors as well as induce cellular attachment.Figure 6

Bottom Line: In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices.Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices.These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage).

Results: The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices.

Conclusions: These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus