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Peptide Vaccine Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

Bartnik A, Nirmal AJ, Yang SY - Vaccines (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer) in the western world.High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy.This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of General Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, UCL Medical School, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK. o.bartnik@ucl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer) in the western world. High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy. Considering the limited success of the past clinical trials involving peptide vaccine therapy to treat colorectal cancer, it is necessary to revise our knowledge of the immune system and its potential use in tackling cancer. This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer. We review recent clinical trials and the strategies for immunologic monitoring of responses to peptide vaccine therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying the therapy and potential molecular targets in colon cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The mechanism of anti-tumour effect of peptide vaccine therapy: introduction of vaccine to the bloodstream; processing and presentation of the peptide by the antigen-presenting cell (APC) in a lymph node resulting in activation of CD4+ helper T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells; interaction between MHC I molecule on APC and T cell receptor (TCR) during antigen presentation facilitated by CD8 molecule; generation of tumour-specific CTLs capable of lysing tumour cells: degranulation of CTL following recognition of tumour antigen and Fas-mediated transduction of death signal to the tumour.
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vaccines-01-00001-f001: The mechanism of anti-tumour effect of peptide vaccine therapy: introduction of vaccine to the bloodstream; processing and presentation of the peptide by the antigen-presenting cell (APC) in a lymph node resulting in activation of CD4+ helper T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells; interaction between MHC I molecule on APC and T cell receptor (TCR) during antigen presentation facilitated by CD8 molecule; generation of tumour-specific CTLs capable of lysing tumour cells: degranulation of CTL following recognition of tumour antigen and Fas-mediated transduction of death signal to the tumour.

Mentions: MHC class II is responsible for “the talk” between APC and CD4+ T cells and subsequent generation of helper T cells. Cytokines secreted by helper T cells, such as IL-2, are essential for activation of strong cytotoxic pathways and potentiation of anti-tumour response [9]. All in all, the CTL encounter with the peptide is at the heart of peptide vaccine therapy. More details of interaction between individual cells can be found in Figure 1.


Peptide Vaccine Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

Bartnik A, Nirmal AJ, Yang SY - Vaccines (Basel) (2012)

The mechanism of anti-tumour effect of peptide vaccine therapy: introduction of vaccine to the bloodstream; processing and presentation of the peptide by the antigen-presenting cell (APC) in a lymph node resulting in activation of CD4+ helper T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells; interaction between MHC I molecule on APC and T cell receptor (TCR) during antigen presentation facilitated by CD8 molecule; generation of tumour-specific CTLs capable of lysing tumour cells: degranulation of CTL following recognition of tumour antigen and Fas-mediated transduction of death signal to the tumour.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4552199&req=5

vaccines-01-00001-f001: The mechanism of anti-tumour effect of peptide vaccine therapy: introduction of vaccine to the bloodstream; processing and presentation of the peptide by the antigen-presenting cell (APC) in a lymph node resulting in activation of CD4+ helper T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells; interaction between MHC I molecule on APC and T cell receptor (TCR) during antigen presentation facilitated by CD8 molecule; generation of tumour-specific CTLs capable of lysing tumour cells: degranulation of CTL following recognition of tumour antigen and Fas-mediated transduction of death signal to the tumour.
Mentions: MHC class II is responsible for “the talk” between APC and CD4+ T cells and subsequent generation of helper T cells. Cytokines secreted by helper T cells, such as IL-2, are essential for activation of strong cytotoxic pathways and potentiation of anti-tumour response [9]. All in all, the CTL encounter with the peptide is at the heart of peptide vaccine therapy. More details of interaction between individual cells can be found in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer) in the western world.High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy.This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of General Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, UCL Medical School, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK. o.bartnik@ucl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer) in the western world. High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy. Considering the limited success of the past clinical trials involving peptide vaccine therapy to treat colorectal cancer, it is necessary to revise our knowledge of the immune system and its potential use in tackling cancer. This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer. We review recent clinical trials and the strategies for immunologic monitoring of responses to peptide vaccine therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying the therapy and potential molecular targets in colon cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus