Limits...
The Impact of Goal Disturbance after Cancer on Cortisol Levels over Time and the Moderating Role of COMT.

Janse M, Faassen Mv, Kema I, Smink A, Ranchor AV, Fleer J, Sprangers MA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of the current study is to examine the impact of goal disturbance on cortisol as a measure of response to stress over time, and a possibly moderating role of a DNA genotype associated with HPA-axis functioning, Catechol-O-Methyl transferase (COMT).Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal disturbance 7 months post-diagnosis significantly predicted a steeper CAR a year later.No other significant effects were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Psychology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Due to physical hindrance and time spent in hospital, a cancer diagnosis can lead to disturbance of personally important goals. Goal disturbance in cancer patients has been related to poorer psychological well-being. However, the relation with physiological measures is yet unknown. The purpose of the current study is to examine the impact of goal disturbance on cortisol as a measure of response to stress over time, and a possibly moderating role of a DNA genotype associated with HPA-axis functioning, Catechol-O-Methyl transferase (COMT). We examined the predictive value of goal disturbance on Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR) and Diurnal Cortisol Slope (DCS) over two periods: 1-7 and 7-18 months post-diagnosis, and the moderating role of COMT during these periods. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal disturbance 7 months post-diagnosis significantly predicted a steeper CAR a year later. During that period, the slow COMT variant moderated the relation, in that patients reporting high goal disturbance and had the Met/Met variant, had a more flattened CAR. No other significant effects were found. As steeper CARs have been related to adverse health outcomes, and COMT genotype may modify this risk, these results indicate that goal disturbance and genotype may be important factors to consider in maintaining better psychological and physical health in the already vulnerable population of cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of patients who provided useful samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4552095&req=5

pone.0135708.g001: Flowchart of patients who provided useful samples.

Mentions: Following Karlamangla et al. [53], we then excluded respondents with extreme waking day lengths (> 20h) (n = 1) and extreme waking times (before 04:00 AM and after 11:00 AM) (n = 2). Additionally, given the importance of time elapsed since awakening on cortisol awakening response [54], we excluded participants who, at any day, failed to collect the first saliva sample within 30 minutes after awakening and the second saliva sample within 30 minutes after the first assessment with a margin of plus or minus 15 minutes (n = 10). Patients who failed to register time of awakening were also excluded because we could not be sure whether the saliva sample was collected within 30–45 minutes after awakening (n = 13). We therefore could analyse cortisol samples of 72 patients (see Fig 1 for the complete flowchart).


The Impact of Goal Disturbance after Cancer on Cortisol Levels over Time and the Moderating Role of COMT.

Janse M, Faassen Mv, Kema I, Smink A, Ranchor AV, Fleer J, Sprangers MA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flowchart of patients who provided useful samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4552095&req=5

pone.0135708.g001: Flowchart of patients who provided useful samples.
Mentions: Following Karlamangla et al. [53], we then excluded respondents with extreme waking day lengths (> 20h) (n = 1) and extreme waking times (before 04:00 AM and after 11:00 AM) (n = 2). Additionally, given the importance of time elapsed since awakening on cortisol awakening response [54], we excluded participants who, at any day, failed to collect the first saliva sample within 30 minutes after awakening and the second saliva sample within 30 minutes after the first assessment with a margin of plus or minus 15 minutes (n = 10). Patients who failed to register time of awakening were also excluded because we could not be sure whether the saliva sample was collected within 30–45 minutes after awakening (n = 13). We therefore could analyse cortisol samples of 72 patients (see Fig 1 for the complete flowchart).

Bottom Line: The purpose of the current study is to examine the impact of goal disturbance on cortisol as a measure of response to stress over time, and a possibly moderating role of a DNA genotype associated with HPA-axis functioning, Catechol-O-Methyl transferase (COMT).Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal disturbance 7 months post-diagnosis significantly predicted a steeper CAR a year later.No other significant effects were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Psychology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Due to physical hindrance and time spent in hospital, a cancer diagnosis can lead to disturbance of personally important goals. Goal disturbance in cancer patients has been related to poorer psychological well-being. However, the relation with physiological measures is yet unknown. The purpose of the current study is to examine the impact of goal disturbance on cortisol as a measure of response to stress over time, and a possibly moderating role of a DNA genotype associated with HPA-axis functioning, Catechol-O-Methyl transferase (COMT). We examined the predictive value of goal disturbance on Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR) and Diurnal Cortisol Slope (DCS) over two periods: 1-7 and 7-18 months post-diagnosis, and the moderating role of COMT during these periods. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal disturbance 7 months post-diagnosis significantly predicted a steeper CAR a year later. During that period, the slow COMT variant moderated the relation, in that patients reporting high goal disturbance and had the Met/Met variant, had a more flattened CAR. No other significant effects were found. As steeper CARs have been related to adverse health outcomes, and COMT genotype may modify this risk, these results indicate that goal disturbance and genotype may be important factors to consider in maintaining better psychological and physical health in the already vulnerable population of cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus