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Morphological defects in native Japanese fir trees around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Watanabe Y, Ichikawa S, Kubota M, Hoshino J, Kubota Y, Maruyama K, Fuma S, Kawaguchi I, Yoschenko VI, Yoshida S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP.A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident.These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 2638555, Japan.

ABSTRACT
After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) in March 2011, much attention has been paid to the biological consequences of the released radionuclides into the surrounding area. We investigated the morphological changes in Japanese fir, a Japanese endemic native conifer, at locations near the F1NPP. Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP. The frequency of the defects corresponded to the radioactive contamination levels of the observation sites. A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident. These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic diagram of Japanese fir tree in January 2015.
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f1: Schematic diagram of Japanese fir tree in January 2015.

Mentions: Coniferous tree species are grown in the area highly radioactive contaminated by the F1NPP accident, where Japanese fir (Abies firma) is one of the most common naturally grown species. Different from other coniferous species, young-tree populations of Japanese fir are abundant, because this species has the characteristic ability to sprout even on the shaded forest floor. The short height of young trees enables the easy observation of morphological changes in the whole tree. In addition, the regular annual branching of Japanese fir trees enables determination of the year that any morphological changes occurred through a number of past years (Fig. 1).


Morphological defects in native Japanese fir trees around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Watanabe Y, Ichikawa S, Kubota M, Hoshino J, Kubota Y, Maruyama K, Fuma S, Kawaguchi I, Yoschenko VI, Yoshida S - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic diagram of Japanese fir tree in January 2015.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551955&req=5

f1: Schematic diagram of Japanese fir tree in January 2015.
Mentions: Coniferous tree species are grown in the area highly radioactive contaminated by the F1NPP accident, where Japanese fir (Abies firma) is one of the most common naturally grown species. Different from other coniferous species, young-tree populations of Japanese fir are abundant, because this species has the characteristic ability to sprout even on the shaded forest floor. The short height of young trees enables the easy observation of morphological changes in the whole tree. In addition, the regular annual branching of Japanese fir trees enables determination of the year that any morphological changes occurred through a number of past years (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP.A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident.These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 2638555, Japan.

ABSTRACT
After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) in March 2011, much attention has been paid to the biological consequences of the released radionuclides into the surrounding area. We investigated the morphological changes in Japanese fir, a Japanese endemic native conifer, at locations near the F1NPP. Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP. The frequency of the defects corresponded to the radioactive contamination levels of the observation sites. A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident. These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP.

No MeSH data available.