Limits...
Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence.

Alshamsi A, Pianesi F, Lepri B, Pentland A, Rahwan I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others.Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals.Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Masdar Institute of Science & Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

ABSTRACT
Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people's behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

No MeSH data available.


Two consecutive snapshots of 1st to 2nd survey in day 1, with the transient social network.Nodes are participants who filled both surveys. Edge thickness is proportional to contact intensity (IR hits) between surveys. Colors represent state levels (red:low, yellow:medium, green:high) and are shown only for egos 1–4 and their alters. The four types of social influence discussed in the text can be seen: ego 1 moved from the neutral level to the high level in the presence of interaction with an alter in the neutral level (push). Ego 2 remained in the high level in correspondence to intense contact with an alter in the high level (inertia). Ego 3 was in the low level and moved to neutral after intense contact with alters in the high level (attraction). Remarkably, the three egos have low scores in their corresponding traits. Ego 4 remained in the low level after contact with an alter in the high level (repulsion). The represented states are creativity for node 1, extraversion for nodes 2 and 4 and agreeableness for node 3.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551670&req=5

pone.0135740.g003: Two consecutive snapshots of 1st to 2nd survey in day 1, with the transient social network.Nodes are participants who filled both surveys. Edge thickness is proportional to contact intensity (IR hits) between surveys. Colors represent state levels (red:low, yellow:medium, green:high) and are shown only for egos 1–4 and their alters. The four types of social influence discussed in the text can be seen: ego 1 moved from the neutral level to the high level in the presence of interaction with an alter in the neutral level (push). Ego 2 remained in the high level in correspondence to intense contact with an alter in the high level (inertia). Ego 3 was in the low level and moved to neutral after intense contact with alters in the high level (attraction). Remarkably, the three egos have low scores in their corresponding traits. Ego 4 remained in the low level after contact with an alter in the high level (repulsion). The represented states are creativity for node 1, extraversion for nodes 2 and 4 and agreeableness for node 3.

Mentions: Attraction and repulsion cover the associations between the intensity of contacts with alters in a level different from the ego’s initial one. But there is no reason not to expect that the intensity of contacts with people in the same level as the ego’s can also affect his/her transition probabilities. For instance, Ego 1 of Fig 3, who was in the neutral level and interacted with an alter in the same level, was pushed to the high level at the later sampling. Ego 2, who was in the high level and interacted with people in that same level, did not move, a situation we call inertia.


Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence.

Alshamsi A, Pianesi F, Lepri B, Pentland A, Rahwan I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Two consecutive snapshots of 1st to 2nd survey in day 1, with the transient social network.Nodes are participants who filled both surveys. Edge thickness is proportional to contact intensity (IR hits) between surveys. Colors represent state levels (red:low, yellow:medium, green:high) and are shown only for egos 1–4 and their alters. The four types of social influence discussed in the text can be seen: ego 1 moved from the neutral level to the high level in the presence of interaction with an alter in the neutral level (push). Ego 2 remained in the high level in correspondence to intense contact with an alter in the high level (inertia). Ego 3 was in the low level and moved to neutral after intense contact with alters in the high level (attraction). Remarkably, the three egos have low scores in their corresponding traits. Ego 4 remained in the low level after contact with an alter in the high level (repulsion). The represented states are creativity for node 1, extraversion for nodes 2 and 4 and agreeableness for node 3.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551670&req=5

pone.0135740.g003: Two consecutive snapshots of 1st to 2nd survey in day 1, with the transient social network.Nodes are participants who filled both surveys. Edge thickness is proportional to contact intensity (IR hits) between surveys. Colors represent state levels (red:low, yellow:medium, green:high) and are shown only for egos 1–4 and their alters. The four types of social influence discussed in the text can be seen: ego 1 moved from the neutral level to the high level in the presence of interaction with an alter in the neutral level (push). Ego 2 remained in the high level in correspondence to intense contact with an alter in the high level (inertia). Ego 3 was in the low level and moved to neutral after intense contact with alters in the high level (attraction). Remarkably, the three egos have low scores in their corresponding traits. Ego 4 remained in the low level after contact with an alter in the high level (repulsion). The represented states are creativity for node 1, extraversion for nodes 2 and 4 and agreeableness for node 3.
Mentions: Attraction and repulsion cover the associations between the intensity of contacts with alters in a level different from the ego’s initial one. But there is no reason not to expect that the intensity of contacts with people in the same level as the ego’s can also affect his/her transition probabilities. For instance, Ego 1 of Fig 3, who was in the neutral level and interacted with an alter in the same level, was pushed to the high level at the later sampling. Ego 2, who was in the high level and interacted with people in that same level, did not move, a situation we call inertia.

Bottom Line: We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others.Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals.Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Masdar Institute of Science & Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

ABSTRACT
Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people's behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

No MeSH data available.