Limits...
Correlation between mass and volume of collected blood with positivity of blood cultures.

Neves L, Marra AR, Camargo TZ, dos Santos MC, Zulin F, da Silva PC, de Moura NA, Victor Eda S, Pasternak J, dos Santos OF, Edmond MB, Martino MD - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: Over an 8-month period we developed a prospective, observational study in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU).BSIs were classified as nosocomial in 34.5%.For blood volume collected, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated at 1.02 (95% CI: 1.01-1.03, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.199).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. lariessa.neves@einstein.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: The collection of blood cultures is an extremely important method in the management of patients with suspected infection. Microbiology laboratories should monitor blood culture collection.

Methods: Over an 8-month period we developed a prospective, observational study in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We correlated the mass contained in the blood vials with blood culture positivity and we also verified the relationship between the mass of blood and blood volume collected for the diagnosis of bloodstream infection (BSI), as well as we explored factors predicting positive blood cultures.

Results: We evaluated 345 patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for whom blood culture bottles were collected for the diagnosis of BSI. Of the 55 patients with BSI, 40.0% had peripheral blood culture collection only. BSIs were classified as nosocomial in 34.5%. In the multivariate model, the blood culture mass (in grams) remained a significant predictor of positivity, with an odds ratio 1.01 (i.e., for each additional 1 mL of blood collected there was a 1% increase in positivity; 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p = 0.001; Nagelkerke R Square [R(2)] = 0.192). For blood volume collected, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated at 1.02 (95% CI: 1.01-1.03, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.199). For each set of collected blood cultures beyond one set, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated to be 1.27 (95% CI: 1.14-1.41, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.221).

Conclusions: Our study was a quality improvement project that showed that microbiology laboratories can use the weight of blood culture bottles to determine if appropriate volume has been collected to improve the diagnosis of BSI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between total collected blood volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures. On the left ROC curve for total collected volume; on the right ROC curve for total weight. There is evidence between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analysed per patient
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551380&req=5

Fig1: Relationship between total collected blood volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures. On the left ROC curve for total collected volume; on the right ROC curve for total weight. There is evidence between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analysed per patient

Mentions: There is strong evidence of a relationship between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analyzed per patient as seen in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Correlation between mass and volume of collected blood with positivity of blood cultures.

Neves L, Marra AR, Camargo TZ, dos Santos MC, Zulin F, da Silva PC, de Moura NA, Victor Eda S, Pasternak J, dos Santos OF, Edmond MB, Martino MD - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Relationship between total collected blood volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures. On the left ROC curve for total collected volume; on the right ROC curve for total weight. There is evidence between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analysed per patient
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551380&req=5

Fig1: Relationship between total collected blood volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures. On the left ROC curve for total collected volume; on the right ROC curve for total weight. There is evidence between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analysed per patient
Mentions: There is strong evidence of a relationship between the total collected volume or total weight and positivity of blood cultures when analyzed per patient as seen in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Over an 8-month period we developed a prospective, observational study in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU).BSIs were classified as nosocomial in 34.5%.For blood volume collected, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated at 1.02 (95% CI: 1.01-1.03, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.199).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. lariessa.neves@einstein.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: The collection of blood cultures is an extremely important method in the management of patients with suspected infection. Microbiology laboratories should monitor blood culture collection.

Methods: Over an 8-month period we developed a prospective, observational study in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We correlated the mass contained in the blood vials with blood culture positivity and we also verified the relationship between the mass of blood and blood volume collected for the diagnosis of bloodstream infection (BSI), as well as we explored factors predicting positive blood cultures.

Results: We evaluated 345 patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for whom blood culture bottles were collected for the diagnosis of BSI. Of the 55 patients with BSI, 40.0% had peripheral blood culture collection only. BSIs were classified as nosocomial in 34.5%. In the multivariate model, the blood culture mass (in grams) remained a significant predictor of positivity, with an odds ratio 1.01 (i.e., for each additional 1 mL of blood collected there was a 1% increase in positivity; 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p = 0.001; Nagelkerke R Square [R(2)] = 0.192). For blood volume collected, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated at 1.02 (95% CI: 1.01-1.03, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.199). For each set of collected blood cultures beyond one set, the adjusted odds ratio was estimated to be 1.27 (95% CI: 1.14-1.41, p < 0.001; R(2) = 0.221).

Conclusions: Our study was a quality improvement project that showed that microbiology laboratories can use the weight of blood culture bottles to determine if appropriate volume has been collected to improve the diagnosis of BSI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus