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Magnetic resonance imaging anatomy of the rabbit brain at 3 T.

Müllhaupt D, Augsburger H, Schwarz A, Fischer G, Kircher P, Hatt JM, Ohlerth S - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Bottom Line: Typical features of a lissencephalic brain type were described.The optic, trigeminal, and in part, the facial, vestibulocochlear and trochlear nerves were identified.Absolute and relative size of the pituitary gland, midline area of the cranial and caudal cranial fossa and height of the tel- and diencephalon, 3rd and 4th ventricles were also determined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 285c, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. desiree.muellhaupt@access.uzh.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rabbits are widely accepted as an animal model in neuroscience research. They also represent very popular pet animals, and, in selected clinical cases with neurological signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be indicated for imaging the rabbit brain. Literature on the normal MRI anatomy of the rabbit brain and associated structures as well as related reference values is sparse. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to generate an MRI atlas of the normal rabbit brain including the pituitary gland, the cranial nerves and major vessels by the use of a 3 T magnet.

Results: Based on transverse, dorsal and sagittal T2-weighted (T2w) and pre- and post-contrast 3D T1-weighted (T1w) sequences, 60 intracranial structures were identified and labeled. Typical features of a lissencephalic brain type were described. In the 5 investigated rabbits, on T1w images a crescent-shaped hyperintense area caudodorsally in the pituitary gland most likely corresponded to a part of the neurohypophysis. The optic, trigeminal, and in part, the facial, vestibulocochlear and trochlear nerves were identified. Mild contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve was present in all rabbits. Absolute and relative size of the pituitary gland, midline area of the cranial and caudal cranial fossa and height of the tel- and diencephalon, 3rd and 4th ventricles were also determined.

Conclusions: These data established normal MRI appearance and measurements of the rabbit brain. Results provide reference for research studies in rabbits and, in rare instances, clinical cases in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Transverse images of the rabbit brain at the level of the mid telencephalon (left T2w; middle T1w; right T1w post-contrast)
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Fig8: Transverse images of the rabbit brain at the level of the mid telencephalon (left T2w; middle T1w; right T1w post-contrast)

Mentions: In general, no significant anatomic differences were diagnosed subjectively in the 5 rabbits, and presented structures appeared normal in all sequences. Transverse T2w images included 24 or 25 sections from the cribriform plate to the cranial aspect of the atlas. Nine representative transverse T2w images were defined at different levels (reference sagittal scan, Fig. 4) and corresponding transverse pre- and post-contrast T1w images (Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) were labeled according to an English and Latin index of structures (Table 1). A complete MRI study of one rabbit brain including all images of all sequences is provided as Additional file 1: 1–6.Fig. 4


Magnetic resonance imaging anatomy of the rabbit brain at 3 T.

Müllhaupt D, Augsburger H, Schwarz A, Fischer G, Kircher P, Hatt JM, Ohlerth S - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Transverse images of the rabbit brain at the level of the mid telencephalon (left T2w; middle T1w; right T1w post-contrast)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4551377&req=5

Fig8: Transverse images of the rabbit brain at the level of the mid telencephalon (left T2w; middle T1w; right T1w post-contrast)
Mentions: In general, no significant anatomic differences were diagnosed subjectively in the 5 rabbits, and presented structures appeared normal in all sequences. Transverse T2w images included 24 or 25 sections from the cribriform plate to the cranial aspect of the atlas. Nine representative transverse T2w images were defined at different levels (reference sagittal scan, Fig. 4) and corresponding transverse pre- and post-contrast T1w images (Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) were labeled according to an English and Latin index of structures (Table 1). A complete MRI study of one rabbit brain including all images of all sequences is provided as Additional file 1: 1–6.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Typical features of a lissencephalic brain type were described.The optic, trigeminal, and in part, the facial, vestibulocochlear and trochlear nerves were identified.Absolute and relative size of the pituitary gland, midline area of the cranial and caudal cranial fossa and height of the tel- and diencephalon, 3rd and 4th ventricles were also determined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 285c, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. desiree.muellhaupt@access.uzh.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rabbits are widely accepted as an animal model in neuroscience research. They also represent very popular pet animals, and, in selected clinical cases with neurological signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be indicated for imaging the rabbit brain. Literature on the normal MRI anatomy of the rabbit brain and associated structures as well as related reference values is sparse. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to generate an MRI atlas of the normal rabbit brain including the pituitary gland, the cranial nerves and major vessels by the use of a 3 T magnet.

Results: Based on transverse, dorsal and sagittal T2-weighted (T2w) and pre- and post-contrast 3D T1-weighted (T1w) sequences, 60 intracranial structures were identified and labeled. Typical features of a lissencephalic brain type were described. In the 5 investigated rabbits, on T1w images a crescent-shaped hyperintense area caudodorsally in the pituitary gland most likely corresponded to a part of the neurohypophysis. The optic, trigeminal, and in part, the facial, vestibulocochlear and trochlear nerves were identified. Mild contrast enhancement of the trigeminal nerve was present in all rabbits. Absolute and relative size of the pituitary gland, midline area of the cranial and caudal cranial fossa and height of the tel- and diencephalon, 3rd and 4th ventricles were also determined.

Conclusions: These data established normal MRI appearance and measurements of the rabbit brain. Results provide reference for research studies in rabbits and, in rare instances, clinical cases in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.