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Association between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and the mortality of HBV-related liver cirrhosis: a retrospective cohort study.

Zhang J, Feng G, Zhao Y, Zhang J, Feng L, Yang J - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The MELD score and mortality were statistically higher in patients with LC compared with the CHB and control groups.The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that LMR was an independent predictive factor of mortality in LC (OR 2.370, 95% CI (1.070 to 5.249); p=0.033).Our results strongly suggest that low LMR can be considered as an independent biomarker for predicting mortality in patients with LC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The box plots of the MELD score and LMR between surviving and non-surviving patients with LC. LMR, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio; MELD score, model for end-stage liver disease score.
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BMJOPEN2015008033F1: The box plots of the MELD score and LMR between surviving and non-surviving patients with LC. LMR, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio; MELD score, model for end-stage liver disease score.

Mentions: The LMR was significantly lower in the LC group compared with the control group (2.77 vs 5.30, respectively) and the CHB group (2.77 vs 3.64; p<0.01). The clinical characteristics and differences in variables between non-surviving and surviving patients with LC are presented in table 2. The non-surviving patients had a lower LMR (figure 1), TP, ALB and Tch, and a higher MELD score, TB, ALT, AST, TG, Cr, INR, WCC, monocytes and rate of decompensated cirrhosis, compared with surviving patients. The median and range of lymphocyte count of the non-surviving group were slightly lower than those of the surviving group, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. These data indicate that the lower LMR in the non-surviving group was mainly due to an increased number of monocytes and secondarily due to decreased lymphocytes. LMR resulted in no significant differences in patients with LC whose primary cause of death was upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy or hepatorenal syndrome (1.35 (0.35–17.75), 1.42 (0.27–18.20), 1.39 (0.39–18.25), p=0.955).


Association between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and the mortality of HBV-related liver cirrhosis: a retrospective cohort study.

Zhang J, Feng G, Zhao Y, Zhang J, Feng L, Yang J - BMJ Open (2015)

The box plots of the MELD score and LMR between surviving and non-surviving patients with LC. LMR, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio; MELD score, model for end-stage liver disease score.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4550728&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008033F1: The box plots of the MELD score and LMR between surviving and non-surviving patients with LC. LMR, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio; MELD score, model for end-stage liver disease score.
Mentions: The LMR was significantly lower in the LC group compared with the control group (2.77 vs 5.30, respectively) and the CHB group (2.77 vs 3.64; p<0.01). The clinical characteristics and differences in variables between non-surviving and surviving patients with LC are presented in table 2. The non-surviving patients had a lower LMR (figure 1), TP, ALB and Tch, and a higher MELD score, TB, ALT, AST, TG, Cr, INR, WCC, monocytes and rate of decompensated cirrhosis, compared with surviving patients. The median and range of lymphocyte count of the non-surviving group were slightly lower than those of the surviving group, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. These data indicate that the lower LMR in the non-surviving group was mainly due to an increased number of monocytes and secondarily due to decreased lymphocytes. LMR resulted in no significant differences in patients with LC whose primary cause of death was upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy or hepatorenal syndrome (1.35 (0.35–17.75), 1.42 (0.27–18.20), 1.39 (0.39–18.25), p=0.955).

Bottom Line: The MELD score and mortality were statistically higher in patients with LC compared with the CHB and control groups.The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that LMR was an independent predictive factor of mortality in LC (OR 2.370, 95% CI (1.070 to 5.249); p=0.033).Our results strongly suggest that low LMR can be considered as an independent biomarker for predicting mortality in patients with LC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus