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The impact of distance and duration of travel on participation rates and participants' satisfaction: results from a pilot study at one study centre in Pretest 2 of the German National Cohort.

Schweitzer A, Akmatov MK, Kindler F, Kemmling Y, Kreienbrock L, Krause G, Pessler F - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Increasing distance was associated with a lower participation rate.However, acceptance of duration of travel was high, irrespective of distance or duration.Thus, recruiting in farther away locations may select individuals with a greater frustration tolerance for travel to the study centre, perhaps due to a greater interest in participating in health-oriented studies and thus different health-related behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany.

No MeSH data available.


Map of the recruitment areas, showing median distances, self-reported duration of travel to the study centre and participation rates. Median distances from the participants’ residences were estimated with Google Maps using postal codes of the participants’ addresses. Participation rates (blue font) were calculated by dividing the total number of participants from each area by the total number of people invited from each area. Duration of travel was self-reported by the participants. The bar charts show frequencies with which the participants from each of the four recruitment areas reported the six time categories of travel duration plotted along the x-axis.
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BMJOPEN2014007461F1: Map of the recruitment areas, showing median distances, self-reported duration of travel to the study centre and participation rates. Median distances from the participants’ residences were estimated with Google Maps using postal codes of the participants’ addresses. Participation rates (blue font) were calculated by dividing the total number of participants from each area by the total number of people invited from each area. Duration of travel was self-reported by the participants. The bar charts show frequencies with which the participants from each of the four recruitment areas reported the six time categories of travel duration plotted along the x-axis.

Mentions: Between September and December 2012, 1050 individuals were contacted by mail. The overall participation rate in Pretest 2 at the Study Centre Hannover was 16% (166/1050). All participants at this study centre took part in the travel questionnaire survey. The median age of the participants was 52 years (IQR 43–61). The male-to-female ratio was 1:1. The participation rate was highest among those aged 60–69 years (19%; 50/269) and lowest among those aged 20–29 years (11%, 12/105). Across recruitment areas, the participation rate was highest in Hannover city (18%), slightly lower in Lehrte (17%) and Isernhagen (16%), and by far the lowest in Neustadt (11%), the region farthest away from the study centre (figure 1). Table 1 depicts sociodemographic characteristics of the participants. We did not find any statistically significant differences among the four areas in terms of the available sociodemographic variables (table 1).


The impact of distance and duration of travel on participation rates and participants' satisfaction: results from a pilot study at one study centre in Pretest 2 of the German National Cohort.

Schweitzer A, Akmatov MK, Kindler F, Kemmling Y, Kreienbrock L, Krause G, Pessler F - BMJ Open (2015)

Map of the recruitment areas, showing median distances, self-reported duration of travel to the study centre and participation rates. Median distances from the participants’ residences were estimated with Google Maps using postal codes of the participants’ addresses. Participation rates (blue font) were calculated by dividing the total number of participants from each area by the total number of people invited from each area. Duration of travel was self-reported by the participants. The bar charts show frequencies with which the participants from each of the four recruitment areas reported the six time categories of travel duration plotted along the x-axis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4550716&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007461F1: Map of the recruitment areas, showing median distances, self-reported duration of travel to the study centre and participation rates. Median distances from the participants’ residences were estimated with Google Maps using postal codes of the participants’ addresses. Participation rates (blue font) were calculated by dividing the total number of participants from each area by the total number of people invited from each area. Duration of travel was self-reported by the participants. The bar charts show frequencies with which the participants from each of the four recruitment areas reported the six time categories of travel duration plotted along the x-axis.
Mentions: Between September and December 2012, 1050 individuals were contacted by mail. The overall participation rate in Pretest 2 at the Study Centre Hannover was 16% (166/1050). All participants at this study centre took part in the travel questionnaire survey. The median age of the participants was 52 years (IQR 43–61). The male-to-female ratio was 1:1. The participation rate was highest among those aged 60–69 years (19%; 50/269) and lowest among those aged 20–29 years (11%, 12/105). Across recruitment areas, the participation rate was highest in Hannover city (18%), slightly lower in Lehrte (17%) and Isernhagen (16%), and by far the lowest in Neustadt (11%), the region farthest away from the study centre (figure 1). Table 1 depicts sociodemographic characteristics of the participants. We did not find any statistically significant differences among the four areas in terms of the available sociodemographic variables (table 1).

Bottom Line: Increasing distance was associated with a lower participation rate.However, acceptance of duration of travel was high, irrespective of distance or duration.Thus, recruiting in farther away locations may select individuals with a greater frustration tolerance for travel to the study centre, perhaps due to a greater interest in participating in health-oriented studies and thus different health-related behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany.

No MeSH data available.